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The introductory text should contain general information about the site, which may include for instance:
• geographic/ biogeographic location
• habitat and vegetation
• typical bird species/bird communities
• protection status
• land use and history
• importance for birdwatching

Coordinates were set by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) : 22.2410/113.9769 (2020-12-26 21:01:51 )

Site name was set by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) as "Pui O" (2020-12-26 21:01:51 )

Not available yet

List up to ca. 25 species that:
• have a limited distribution range and/or are rare on a global level
• are most sought-after by birdwatchers at this site
• and are relatively easy to see at this site (year-round or seasonally)

Kentish Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus)
Intermediate Egret (Ardea intermedia)
Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis)
Black-capped Kingfisher (Halcyon pileata)
Dusky Thrush (Turdus eunomus)
Asian Brown Flycatcher (Muscicapa dauurica)
Eastern Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla tschutschensis)
Richard's Pipit (Anthus richardi)
Red-throated Pipit (Anthus cervinus)
American Pipit (Anthus rubescens)

Black-capped Kingfisher (Halcyon pileata) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:07:41)

Asian Brown Flycatcher (Muscicapa dauurica) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:07:26)

Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) was deleted by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:06:56)

Kentish Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:06:51)

Dusky Thrush (Turdus eunomus) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:06:40)

Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:06:20)

Intermediate Egret (Ardea intermedia) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:06:12)

Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:06:03)

Eastern Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla tschutschensis) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:05:47)

Red-throated Pipit (Anthus cervinus) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:05:37)

Richard's Pipit (Anthus richardi) was added by Twq Ywq (2022-01-01 12:05:29)

Richard's Pipit (Anthus richardi) was deleted by Twq Ywq (2021-09-04 11:14:35)

Olive-backed Pipit (Anthus hodgsoni) was deleted by Twq Ywq (2021-09-04 11:14:27)

Olive-backed Pipit (Anthus hodgsoni) was added by Twq Ywq (2021-09-04 11:14:01)

Richard's Pipit (Anthus richardi) was added by Twq Ywq (2021-09-04 11:12:42)

American Pipit (Anthus rubescens) was added by Twq Ywq (2021-09-04 11:12:08)

Pui O is at its most exciting for birders in the winter. I would imagine that it will still be worth a visit in spring or autumn. (Even at the height of summer, Pui O is full of frogs at night, if you're keen on them.)

There are several habitats to explore in the area:

  • The main attraction of Pui O is a buffalo field, which you can view on a path that runs through it. Unsurprisingly, Cattle Egret are easy to find there, as are Little and sometimes Intermediate Egret. Wagtails and pipits often feed on the ground - you may need a spotting scope to see them properly. There can be ducks, plovers, snipes and even the odd lapwing or hoopoe. If you're very lucky, you may find a wintering Dusky Thrush. NB: The path through this field is narrow. So if you see a buffalo coming your way and actually walking on the same path, do the following. Either do whatever other people on the path are doing - there are many villagers at Pui O who would know exactly what to do, and you are likely to have one in sight - or, if you're alone and it's not obvious that the buffalo can just walk by you, then yield the path to the buffalo by walking in the same direction in which the buffalo is walking, until the buffalo gets off the path. All the buffaloes I have come across at Pui O have been perfectly peaceful, but I have also heard 'stories'. 
  • The beach has had a small party of Kentish Plover in the winter for many years now. 
  • The trees by the beach and by the campsite can get flycatchers. 
  • Along a section of Chi Ma Wan Road, you will see a river running alongside. There will usually be at least one Common Kingfisher. Black-capped Kingfisher are also there each winter. 

Give recommendations for making your visit as productive as possible.
This may include for instance:
• best season
• best time of the day
• how much time to spend at the site
• best means of locomotion within the site
• recommended routes / areas within the site
• guiding

Edited by Twq Ywq on 2022-01-01 12:20
Pui O is at its most exciting for birders in the winter. I would imagine that it will still be worth a visit in spring or autumn. (Even at the height of summer, Pui O is full of frogs at night, if you're keen on them.) There are several habitats to explore in the area: The main attraction of Pui O is a buffalo field, which you can view on a path that runs through it. Unsurprisingly, Cattle Egret are easy to find there, as are Little and sometimes Intermediate Egret. Wagtails and pipits often feed on the ground - you may need a spotting scope to see them properly. There can be ducks, plovers, snipes and even the odd lapwing or hoopoe. If you're very lucky, you may find a wintering Dusky Thrush. Thrush. NB: The path through this field is narrow. So if you see a buffalo coming your way and actually walking on the same path, do the following. Either do whatever other people on the path are doing - there are many villagers at Pui O who would know exactly what to do, and you are likely to have one in sight - or, if you're alone and it's not obvious that the buffalo can just walk by you, then yield the path to the buffalo by walking in the same direction in which the buffalo is walking, until the buffalo gets off the path. All the buffaloes I have come across at Pui O have been perfectly peaceful, but I have also heard 'stories'.  The beach has had a small party of Kentish Plover in the winter for many years now.  The trees by the beach and by the campsite can get flycatchers.  Along a section of Chi Ma Wan Road, you will see a river running alongside. There will usually be at least one Common Kingfisher. Black-capped Kingfisher are also there each winter. 
Edited by Twq Ywq on 2022-01-01 12:00
Pui O is at its most exciting for birders in the winter. I would imagine that it will still be worth a visit in spring or autumn. (Even at the height of summer, Pui O is full of frogs at night, if you're keen on them.) There are several habitats to explore in the area: The main attraction of Pui O is a buffalo field, which you can view on a path that runs through it. Unsurprisingly, Cattle Egret are easy to find there, as are Little and sometimes Intermediate Egret. Wagtails and pipits often feed on the ground - you may need a spotting scope to see them properly. There can be ducks, plovers, snipes and even the odd lapwing or hoopoe. If you're very lucky, you may find a wintering Dusky Thrush. The beach has had a small party of Kentish Plover in the winter for many years now.  The trees by the beach and by the campsite can get flycatchers.  If you go down Along a section of Chi Ma Wan Road, you will see a river running alongside it.alongside. There will usually be at least one Common Kingfisher. Black-capped Kingfisher are also there each winter. 
Edited by Twq Ywq on 2022-01-01 11:58
Pui O is at its most exciting for birders in the winter. I would imagine that it will still be worth a visit in spring or autumn. (Even at the height of summer, Pui O is full of frogs at night, if you're keen on them.) There are several habitats to explore in the area: The main attraction of Pui O is a buffalo field, which you can view on a path that runs through it. Unsurprisingly, Cattle Egret are easy to find there, as are Little and sometimes Intermediate Egret. Wagtails and pipits often feed on the ground - you may need a spotting scope to see them properly. There can be ducks, plovers, snipes and even the odd lapwing or hoopoe. If you're very lucky, you may find a wintering Dusky Thrush. The beach has had a small party of Kentish Plover in the winter for many years now.  The trees by the beach and by the campsite can get flycatchers.  If you go down Chi Ma Wan Road, you will see a river running alongside it. There will usually be at least one Common Kingfisher. Black-capped Kingfisher are also there each winter. 

Bus routes 1 (which run between Mui Wo Ferry Pier and Tai O) and 3M (running between Tung Chung MTR Station Bus Terminus and Mui Wo Ferry Pier) stops at Pui O, in both directions of each route. Every habitat I describe above is merely a short walk from the bus stop at Pui O. 

Explain from where and how to get to this site with private and public transport.

Edited by Twq Ywq on 2022-01-01 12:04
Bus routes 1 (which run between Mui Wo Ferry Pier and Tai O) and 3M (running between Tung Chung MTR Station Bus Terminus and Mui Wo Ferry Pier) stops at Pui O, in both directions of each route. Every habitat I describe above is merely a short walk from the bus stop at Pui O. 

Provide information on how to enter this site, which may include:
• entry points
• entry permits / entry tickets and fees
• opening hours / opening season
• other restrictions

Note that this section should only contain information on how to ACCESS (= enter) a site. Info on how to REACH a site should be added to "How to get there" section.

Not available yet

Add information about other attractions at this site, including
• wildlife (apart from birds)
• sights (natural, cultural, archaeological, etc.)
• activities (e.g. for non-birding companions)

Not available yet

Provide information about what type of facilities are available at
or near this site, including:
• information centers / information points
• catering
• accommodation
• hides and watchtowers
• restrooms / toilets

Not available yet

I repeat what I said above.

NB: The path through the buffalo field is narrow. So if you see a buffalo coming your way and actually walking on the same path, do the following. Either do whatever other people on the path are doing - there are many villagers at Pui O, who would know exactly what to do, and you are likely to have one in sight - or, if you're alone and it's not obvious that the buffalo can just walk by you, then yield the path to the buffalo by walking in the same direction in which the buffalo is walking, until the buffalo gets off the path. All the buffaloes I have come across at Pui O have been perfectly peaceful, but I have also heard 'stories'. 

Are there any security issues or other annoyances at this site? For
instance, these may include:
• offenses like robbery or theft
• natural hazards
• dangerous or annoying animals or plants (mosquitoes, leaches, thorn bushes, etc.)
• noise pollution

Edited by Twq Ywq on 2022-01-01 12:22
I repeat what I said above. NB: The path through the buffalo field is narrow. So if you see a buffalo coming your way and actually walking on the same path, do the following. Either do whatever other people on the path are doing - there are many villagers at Pui O O, who would know exactly what to do, and you are likely to have one in sight - or, if you're alone and it's not obvious that the buffalo can just walk by you, then yield the path to the buffalo by walking in the same direction in which the buffalo is walking, until the buffalo gets off the path. All the buffaloes I have come across at Pui O have been perfectly peaceful, but I have also heard 'stories'. 
Edited by Twq Ywq on 2022-01-01 12:21
I repeat what I said above. NB: The path through this field the buffalo field is narrow. So if you see a buffalo coming your way and actually walking on the same path, do the following. Either do whatever other people on the path are doing - there are many villagers at Pui O who would know exactly what to do, and you are likely to have one in sight - or, if you're alone and it's not obvious that the buffalo can just walk by you, then yield the path to the buffalo by walking in the same direction in which the buffalo is walking, until the buffalo gets off the path. All the buffaloes I have come across at Pui O have been perfectly peaceful, but I have also heard 'stories'. 
Edited by Twq Ywq on 2022-01-01 12:21
I repeat what I said above. NB: The path through this field is narrow. So if you see a buffalo coming your way and actually walking on the same path, do the following. Either do whatever other people on the path are doing - there are many villagers at Pui O who would know exactly what to do, and you are likely to have one in sight - or, if you're alone and it's not obvious that the buffalo can just walk by you, then yield the path to the buffalo by walking in the same direction in which the buffalo is walking, until the buffalo gets off the path. All the buffaloes I have come across at Pui O have been perfectly peaceful, but I have also heard 'stories'. 
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Orniverse: Pui O - Hong Kong