IMG
© Stephen Matthews

Tung Chung Bay

22.28586 , 113.93198

Hong Kong

Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay.

All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including the less common Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (spring migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary in autumn and winter.

On eBird the site is named Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations. For example, the mudflats are suitable for Chinese Egret and this species has been observed on spring passage in ecological surveys, but is not recorded on eBird.

The area is at risk from further development such as the extension of the MTR to Tung Chung West which will bring development very close to the bay.

Delete exact location

The introductory text should contain general information about the site, which may include for instance:
• geographic/ biogeographic location
• habitat and vegetation
• typical bird species/bird communities
• protection status
• land use and history
• importance for birdwatching

Coordinates were set by Stephen Matthews : 22.2859/113.9320 (2022-04-22 11:46:30 )

Site name was set by Stephen Matthews as "Tung Chung Bay" (2022-04-22 11:46:30 )

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:47:33
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including the less common Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (spring migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary in autumn and winter. On eBird the site is recorded as named Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations. For example, the mudflats are suitable for Chinese Egret adn and this species has been observed on spring passage in ecological surveys surveys, but is not recorded on eBird. The area is at risk from further development such as the extension of the MTR to Tung Chung West which will bring development very close to the bay.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:42:52
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including the less common Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (spring migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary in autumn and winter. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations. For example, the mudflats are suitable for Chinese Egret adn this species has been observed on spring passage in ecological surveys but is not recorded on eBird.eBird. The area is at risk from further development such as the extension of the MTR to Tung Chung West which will bring development very close to the bay.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:40:29
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including the less common Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (spring migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary. estuary in autumn and winter. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations. For example, the mudflats are suitable for Chinese Egret adn this species has been observed on spring passage in ecological surveys but is not recorded on eBird.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:39:48
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including the less common Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (spring migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations. Chinese Egret, for For example, the mudflats are suitable for Chinese Egret adn this species has occurred been observed on spring passage in ecological surveys but is not recorded on eBird.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:34:31
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including the less common Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (spring migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations. Chinese Egret, for example, has occurred on spring passage but is not recorded on eBird.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:30:20
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (Spirng (spring migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations. Chinese Egret, for example, has occurred on spring passage but is not recorded on eBird.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 13:12:38
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (Spirng migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations. Chinese Egret, for example, has occurred on spring passage but is not recorded on eBird.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:53:22
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. The site including the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand. It lies literally at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. west. The site includes the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand at the southwest corner of the Bay. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (Spirng migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly underestimates the potential of the area due to insufficient observations.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:18:05
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. The site including the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand. It lies at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (Spirng migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly undertsemates underestimates the optential potential of the area due to insufficient observations.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:17:31
Tung Chung Bay is an ecologically rich area on the mountainous, relatively under-developed island of Lantau. The site including the estuary of the Tung Chung River and a substantial mangrove stand. It lies at the end of the road, at the transition point between the built-up Lantau of Tung Chung and the airport and the wild Lantau to the south and west. All the local species of heron and egret have been seen here, including Striated Heron and Pacific Reef Heron. The mudflats support waders including Common Sandpiper (resident), Little Ringed Plover (winter visitor) and Grey-tailed Tattler (Spirng migrant, regular in May and June). Common and White-throated Kingfisher are seen regularly at the mouth of the estuary. On eBird the site is recorded as Tung Chung Canal and Bay. Around 80 species have been recorded, which certainly undertsemates the optential of the area due to insufficient observations.

List up to ca. 25 species that:
• have a limited distribution range and/or are rare on a global level
• are most sought-after by birdwatchers at this site
• and are relatively easy to see at this site (year-round or seasonally)

Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis)
Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius)
Gray-tailed Tattler (Tringa brevipes)
Pacific Reef-Heron (Egretta sacra)
Striated Heron (Butorides striata)
Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis)
White-throated Kingfisher (Halcyon smyrnensis)
Hair-crested Drongo (Dicrurus hottentottus)
Long-tailed Shrike (Lanius schach)
Daurian Redstart (Phoenicurus auroreus)

Daurian Redstart (Phoenicurus auroreus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:58:29)

Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:57:02)

Long-tailed Shrike (Lanius schach) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:55:32)

Hair-crested Drongo (Dicrurus hottentottus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:55:07)

White-throated Kingfisher (Halcyon smyrnensis) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:54:51)

Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:54:33)

Gray-tailed Tattler (Tringa brevipes) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:54:08)

Pacific Reef-Heron (Egretta sacra) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:53:55)

Striated Heron (Butorides striata) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:53:40)

Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-04-22 11:53:25)

The site is most rewarding from September to May. Morning is generally best but the state of the tide will affect what birds are seen: waders will be difficult to find at high tide. Passerines such as Hair-crested Drongos and (in winter) Daurian Redstarts and Olive-backed Pipits are often seen around the temple and the estuary. Long-tailed Shrikes occur in and around the mangroves.

The richest area is around the mouth of the estuary, which can be viewed from the bridge over the stream and from various points beside the bay depending on the state of the tide (see 'watchpoints' on the map). Kingfishers, various herons, White-breasted Waterhens and Little Grebes can often be seen from the bridge. One can explore this area in an hour or so.

For a longer walk, one can follow the Tung O Ancient Trail to the village of San Tau or beyond. This trail leads to Sha Lo Wan where there are occasional ferries to Tung Chung or Tai O, and eventually to Tai O (a long, scenic walk for which a full day is recommended). From Tai O one can take a ferry or bus back to Tung Chung.  

Give recommendations for making your visit as productive as possible.
This may include for instance:
• best season
• best time of the day
• how much time to spend at the site
• best means of locomotion within the site
• recommended routes / areas within the site
• guiding

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:51
The site is most rewarding from September to May. Morning is generally best but the state of the tide will affect what birds are seen: waders will be difficult to find at high tide. Passerines such as Hair-crested Drongos and (in winter) Daurian Redstarts and Olive-backed Pipits are often seen around the temple and the estuary. estuary. Long-tailed Shrikes occur in and around the mangroves. The richest area is around the mouth of the estuary, which can be viewed from the bridge over the stream and from various points beside the bay depending on the state of the tide (see 'watchpoints' on the map). Kingfishers, various herons, White-breasted Waterhens and Little Grebes can often be seen from the bridge. One can explore this area in an hour or so. For a longer walk, one can follow the Tung O Ancient Trail to the village of San Tau or beyond. This trail leads to Sha Lo Wan where there are occasional ferries to Tung Chung or Tai O, and eventually to Tai O (a long, scenic walk for which a full day is recommended). From Tai O one can take a ferry or bus back to Tung Chung.  
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 11:47
The site is most rewarding from September to May. Morning is generally best but the state of the tide will affect what birds are seen: waders will be difficult to find at high tide. Passerines such as Hair-crested Drongos and (in winter) Daurian Redstarts and Olive-backed Pipits are often seen around the temple and the estuary. The richest area is around the mouth of the estuary, which can be viewed from the bridge over the stream and from various points beside the bay depending on the state of the tide (see 'watchpoints' on the map). One can explore this area in an hour or so. For a longer walk, one can follow the Tung O Ancient Trail to the village of San Tau or beyond. This trail leads to Sha Lo Wan where there are occasional ferries to Tung Chung or Tai O, and eventually to Tai O (a long, scenic walk for which a full day is recommended). From Tai O one can take a ferry or bus back to Tung Chung.  
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 13:10
The site is most rewarding from September to May. Morning is generally best but the state of the tide will affect what birds are seen: waders will  will be difficult to find at high tide. Passerines such as Hair-crested Drongos and (in winter) Daurian Redstarts and Olive-backed Pipits are often seen in the trees around the temple and the estuary. The richest area is around the mouth of the estuary, which can be viewed from the bridge over the stream and from various points beside the bay depending on the state of the tide (see 'watchpoints' on the map). One can explore this area in an hour or so. For a longer walk, one can follow the Tung O Ancient Trail to the village of San Tau or beyond. This trail leads to Sha Lo Wan where there are occasional ferries to Tung Chung or Tai O, and eventually to Tai O (a scenic walk for which a full day is recommended). From Tai O one can take a ferry or bus back to Tung Chung.  
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 13:05
The site is most rewarding from September to May. Morning is generally best but the state of the tide will affect what birds are seen: waders will  be difficult to find at high tide. tide. Passerines such as Hair-crested Drongos and (in winter) Daurian Redstarts and Olive-backed Pipits are often seen in the trees around the temple and the estuary. The richest area is around the mouth of the estuary, which can be viewed from the bridge over the stream and from various points beside the bay depending on the state of the tide (se (see 'watchpoints' on the map). One can explore this area in an hour or so. For a longer walk, one can follow the Tung O Ancient Trail to the village of San Tau or beyond. This trail leads to Sha Lo Wan where there are occasional ferries to Tung Chung or Tai O, and eventually to Tai O (a scenic walk for which a full day is recommended). From Tai O one can take a ferry or bus back to Tung Chung.  
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 13:00
The site is most rewarding from September to May. Morning is generally best but the state of the tide will affect what birds are seen: waders will  be difficult to find at high tide. The richest area is around the mouth of the estuary, which can be viewed from the bridge over the stream and from various points beside the bay depending on the state of the tide.tide (se 'watchpoints' on the map). One can explore this area in an hour or so. For a longer walk, one can follow the Tung O Ancient Trail to the village of San Tau or beyond. This trail leads to Sha Lo Wan where there are occasional ferries to Tung Chung or Tai O, and eventually to Tai O (a scenic walk for which a full dy day is recommended). From Tai O one can take a ferry or bus back to Tung Chung.  
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:50
The site is most rewarding from September to May. Morning is generally best but the state of the tide will affect what birds are seen: waders will  be difficult to find at high tide. The richest area is around the mouth of the estuary, which can be viewed from the bridge over the stream and from various points depending on the state of the tide. One can explore this area in an hour or so. For a longer walk, one can follow the Tung O Ancient Trail to the village of San Tau or beyond. This trail leads to Sha Lo Wan where there are occasional ferries to Tung Chung or Tai O, and eventually to Tai O (a walk for which a full dy is recommended). From Tai O one can take a ferry or bus back to Tung Chung.  

One can walk to the Bay from Tung Chung MTR station via any of the paths shown on the map, such as via the historic Tung Chung Battery and Ma Wan Chung. For a shorter walk, one can take a minibus or taxi from Tung Chung to Yat Tung Estate.

By car, follow the signs for Tung Chung town centre but continue on Yu Tung Road instead of turning right into the town. After Yu Tung Road turns sharply left into Chung Mun Road, one can turn right onto a rough track along which parking is usually possible. Parking is also available at Yat Tung Estate.

Explain from where and how to get to this site with private and public transport.

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 13:01
One can walk to the Bay from Tung Chung MTR station via any of the paths shown on the map, such as via the historic Tung Chung Battery and Ma Wan Chung. For a shorter walk, one can take a minibus or taxi from Tung Chung to Yat Tung Estate. By car, follow the signs for Tung Chung town centre but continue on Yu Tung Road instead of turning right into the town. After the road Yu Tung Road turns sharp sharply left into Chung Mun Road, one can turn right onto a rough track along which parking is usually possible. Parking is also available at Yat Tung Estate.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 13:01
One can walk to the Bay from Tung Chung MTR station via any of the paths shown on the map, such as via the historic Tung Chung Battery and Ma Wan Chung. For a shorter walk, one can take a minibus or taxi from Tung Chung to Yat Tung Estate. By car, follow the signs for Tung Chung town centre but continue on Yu Tung Road instead of turning right into the town. After the road turns sharp left into Chung Mun Road, one can turn right onto a rough track along which parking is usually possible. Parking is also available at Yat Tung Estate.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:32
One can walk to the Bay from Tung Chung MTR station via any of the paths shown on the map, such as via the historic Tung Chung Battery and Ma Wan Chung. For a shorter walk, one can take a minibus or taxi to Yat Tung Estate. By car, follow the signs for Tung Chung town centre but continue on Yu Tung Road instead of turning right into the town. After the road turns sharp left, left into Chung Mun Road, one can turn right onto a rough track along which parking is usually possible. Parking is also available at Yat Tung Estate.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:28
One can walk to the Bay from Tung Chung MTR station via any of the paths shown on the map, such as via the historic Tung Chung Battery and Ma Wan Chung. For a shorter walk, one can take a minibus or taxi to Yat Tung Estate. By car, follow the signs for Tung Chung town centre but continue on Yu Tung Road instead of turning right into the town. After the road turns sharp left, one can turn right onto a rough track along which parking is usually possible. Parking is also available at Yat Tung Estate.

By walking westwards from Tung Chung or Yat Tung Estate, one will reach the Tung Chung Canal, a man-made channel with some boats. From the bridge over the canal, a choice of paths leads westwards towards the Hau Wong Temple.

From the rough track running parallel with Chung Mun Road, either of two paths leads to the Hau Wong Temple.

Provide information on how to enter this site, which may include:
• entry points
• entry permits / entry tickets and fees
• opening hours / opening season
• other restrictions

Note that this section should only contain information on how to ACCESS (= enter) a site. Info on how to REACH a site should be added to "How to get there" section.

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-05-28 13:06
By walking westwards from Tung Chung or Yat Tung Estate, one will reach the Tung Chung Canal, a manmade man-made channel with some boats. From the bridge over the canal, a choice of paths leads westwards towards the Hau Wong Temple. From the rough track running parallel with Chung Mun Road, either of two paths leads to the Hau Wong Temple.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:40
By walking westwards from Tung Chung or Yat Tung Estate, one will reach the Tung Chung Canal,  Canal, a manmade channel with some boats. From the bridge over the canal, a choice of paths leads westwards towards the Hau Wong Temple. From the rough track running parallel with Chung Mun Road, either of two paths leads to the Hau Wong Temple.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:34
By walking westwards from Tung Chung or Yat Tung Estate, one will reach the Tung Chung Canal,  manmade channel with some boats. From the bridge over the canal, a choice of paths leads westwards towards the Hau Wong Temple.

The mangrove stands include most of the local mangrove species, and hold fish, crabs and amphibians as well as dragonflies.

The walk is a pleasant and scenic one which can be enjoyed by non-birding companions. Alternatively, they may enjoy shopping at the Citygate outlet mall in Tung Chung.

Add information about other attractions at this site, including
• wildlife (apart from birds)
• sights (natural, cultural, archaeological, etc.)
• activities (e.g. for non-birding companions)

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:55
The mangrove stands include most of the local mangrove speicies, species, and hold fish, crabs and amphibians as well as dragonflies. The walk is a pleasant and scenic one which can be enjoyed by non-birding companions. Alternatively, they may enjoy shopping at the Citygate outlet mall in Tung Chung.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 13:33
The mangrove stands include most of the local mangrove speicies, and hold fish, crabs and amphibians as well as dragonflies. The walk is a pleasant and scenic one which can be enjoyed by non-birding companions. Alternatively, they may enjoy shopping at the Citygate outlet mall in Tung Chung.

There is a small cafe at San Tau and toilets near Hau Wong Temple and at San Tau.

Provide information about what type of facilities are available at
or near this site, including:
• information centers / information points
• catering
• accommodation
• hides and watchtowers
• restrooms / toilets

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:57
There is a small cafe at San Tau and toilets near Hau Wong Temple and at San Tau.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 13:33
There is a cafe at San Tau and toilets near Hau Wng Wong Temple and at San Tau.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 12:51
There is a cafe at San Tau and toilets near Hau Wng Temple and at San Tau.

The site is basically safe, but some visitors unwisely step out onto the mudflats which can be quickly covered by the tide. This also disturbs birds using the mudlfats.

Mosquitoes may be annoying in the wet season (April to September).

When the airport is in operation there is noise pollution from aircraft.

On weekends and holidays the walk from Tung Chung towards Tai O is very popular with hikers, causing some disturbance at watchpoints such as the bridge over the stream.

Are there any security issues or other annoyances at this site? For
instance, these may include:
• offenses like robbery or theft
• natural hazards
• dangerous or annoying animals or plants (mosquitoes, leaches, thorn bushes, etc.)
• noise pollution

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-24 12:59
The site is basically safe, but some visitors unwisely step out onto the mudflats which can be quickly covered by the tide. tide. This also disturbs birds using the mudlfats. Mosquitoes may be annoying in the wet season (April to September). When the ariport airport is in operation there is noise pollution from aircraft. On weekends and holidays the walk from Tung Chung towards Tai O is very popular with hikers.hikers, causing some disturbance at watchpoints such as the bridge over the stream.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-04-22 13:36
The site is basically safe, but some visitors unwisely step out onto the mudflats which can be quickly covered by the tide. Mosquitoes may be annoying in the wet season (April to September). When the ariport is in operation there is noise pollution from aircraft. On weekends and holidays the walk from Tung Chung towards Tai O is very popular with hikers.
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Orniverse: Tung Chung Bay - Hong Kong