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© Stephen Matthews

Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harriers, Bitterns and even a pair of Common Cranes from the Levels population, all of which have bred or attempted to breed in recent years.

In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers, while Hobbies feed on dragonflies. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields, ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe, Dunlin and Ruff frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields. 

According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it one of the most productive sites in the county of Oxfordshire. For recent reports, see eBird and the 'Otmoor Birding' blog.

Delete exact location

The introductory text should contain general information about the site, which may include for instance:
• geographic/ biogeographic location
• habitat and vegetation
• typical bird species/bird communities
• protection status
• land use and history
• importance for birdwatching

Coordinates were changed by Stephen Matthews : 51.8095/-1.1747 (2022-11-14 13:29:46 )

Coordinates were set by Stephen Matthews : 51.8095/-1.1747 (2022-11-14 11:36:11 )

Site name was set by Stephen Matthews as "RSPB Otmoor" (2022-11-14 11:36:11 )

Edited by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) on 2022-12-31 18:21:49
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harriers, Bitterns and even a pair of Common Cranes from the Levels population, all of which have bred or attempted to breed in recent years. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers, while Hobbies feed on dragonflies. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields, ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe, Dunlin and Ruff frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it one of the most productive sites in the county of Oxfordshire. For recent reports, see eBird and the 'Otmoor Birding' blog.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 13:47:08
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis Harriers, Bitterns and even a pair of Common Cranes from the Levels population, all of which have bred or attempted to breed in recent years. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers, while Hobbies feed on dragonflies. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields, ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe, Dunlin and Ruff frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it one of the most productive sites in the county of Oxfordshire. For recent reports, see eBird and the 'Otmoor Birding' blog.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 12:33:03
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even a pair of Common Cranes from the Levels population, which have attempted to breed in recent years. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers, while Hobbies feed on dragonflies. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and fields, ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Snipe, Dunlin and Ruff frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it one of the most productive sites in the county of Oxfordshire. For recent reports, see eBird and the 'Otmoor Birding' blog.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:39:21
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even a pair of Common Cranes from the Levels population, which have attempted to breed in recent years. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers, while Hobbies feed on dragonflies. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Dunlin frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it one of the second most productive site sites in the county of Oxfordshire. For recent reports, see eBird and the 'Otmoor Birding' blog.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:32:30
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even a pair of Common Cranes from the Levels population. population, which have attempted to breed in recent years. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers, while Hobbies feed on dragonflies. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Dunlin frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it the second most productive site in the county of Oxfordshire. For recent reports, see eBird and the 'Otmoor Birding' blog.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:15:19
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even Common Cranes from the Levels population. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers, while Hobbies feed on dragonflies. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Dunlin frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it the second most productive site in the county of Oxfordshire. For recent reports, see eBird and the 'Otmoor Birding' blog.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:29:46
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even Common Cranes from the Levels population. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers.Warblers, while Hobbies feed on dragonflies. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Dunlin frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it the second most productive site in the county of Oxfordshire.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:26:23
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even Common Cranes from the Levels population. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed Reed, Cetti's and Common Grasshopper Warblers. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Dunlin frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it the second most productive site in the county of Oxfordshire.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:19:31
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With a its clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even Common Cranes from the Levels population. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed and Common Grasshopper Warblers. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Dunlin frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.  According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it the second most productive site in the county of Oxfordshire.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:18:49
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With a clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even Common Cranes from the Levels population. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed and Common Grasshopper Warblers. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Dunlin frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields.   According to The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker, around 230 species have been recorded at Otmoor, making it the second most productive site in the county of Oxfordshire.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:13:03
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With a clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even Common Cranes from the Levels population. In summer the marshes support breeding warblers such as Sedge, Reed and Common Grasshopper Warblers. In winter geese graze on the flooded fields and ducks use the ponds, waders including Lapwing, Snipe and Dunlin frequent the scrape, and Short-eared Owls and Hen Harriers hunt over the fields. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:53:54
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With a clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels. Indeed a similar range of wetland birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern Bittern, Glossy Ibis and even Common Cranes from the Levels population.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:51:05
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With a clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels, Levels. Indeed a similar range of birds occur here, including Marsh Harrier, Great Bittern and indeed cranes even Common Cranes from the Levels have ben seen here.population.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:19:43
Otmoor is a large flood basin to the northeast of Oxford. With a clay soil, the basin traps water and becomes flooded in winter, forming an important wetland area of marshes, ponds, water meadows, fields and moorland. The RSPB manages around 1000 acres as its Otmoor Reserve. In addition, a strip of land immediately to the east is used by the Ministry of Defence for target practice, including some Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). Beyond this are two smaller reserves managed by the Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT). The result is a large patchwork of protected wetland, rather like the even larger Somerset Levels, and indeed cranes from the Levels have ben seen here.

List up to ca. 25 species that:
• have a limited distribution range and/or are rare on a global level
• are most sought-after by birdwatchers at this site
• and are relatively easy to see at this site (year-round or seasonally)

European Turtle-Dove (Streptopelia turtur)
European Golden-Plover (Pluvialis apricaria)
Ruff (Calidris pugnax)
Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago)
Great Bittern (Botaurus stellaris)
Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus)
Eurasian Marsh-Harrier (Circus aeruginosus)
Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus)
Merlin (Falco columbarius)
Eurasian Hobby (Falco subbuteo)
Common Grasshopper Warbler (Locustella naevia)
Common Redstart (Phoenicurus phoenicurus)

European Golden-Plover (Pluvialis apricaria) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-19 13:40:21)

Ruff (Calidris pugnax) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-19 12:31:50)

Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-15 13:55:10)

European Turtle-Dove (Streptopelia turtur) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-15 13:43:45)

Common Redstart (Phoenicurus phoenicurus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-14 13:37:06)

Common Grasshopper Warbler (Locustella naevia) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-14 13:36:19)

Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-14 12:53:21)

Eurasian Marsh-Harrier (Circus aeruginosus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-14 12:52:51)

Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-14 12:52:31)

Great Bittern (Botaurus stellaris) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-14 12:51:24)

Merlin (Falco columbarius) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-14 12:45:34)

Eurasian Hobby (Falco subbuteo) was added by Stephen Matthews (2022-11-14 12:45:21)

Otmoor has much to offer at all seasons. In summer breeding species include numerous warblers and Common Cuckoo, parasitizing Reed Warbler nests. Common Terns also breed here, while European Turtle-doves traditionally breed but are in decline, as in most of the country. Hobbies occur regularly in spring and summer, replaced in winter by Merlins, Hen Harriers and Short-eared Owls. Waterfowl and waders accumulate during the winter months.

The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit. From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through the lightly wooded triangular area north of the car park. 

These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west and forming the southern boundary of the reserve (marked in green on the map). Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the reed bed and scrape.

Give recommendations for making your visit as productive as possible.
This may include for instance:
• best season
• best time of the day
• how much time to spend at the site
• best means of locomotion within the site
• recommended routes / areas within the site
• guiding

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 13:48
Otmoor has much to offer at all seasons. In summer breeding species include numerous warblers and Common Cuckoo, parasitizing Reed Warbler nests. Common Terns also breed here, while European Turtle-doves traditionally breed but are in decline, as in most of the country. Hobbies occur regularly in spring and summer, replaced in winter by Merlins, Hen Harriers and Short-eared Owls. Waterfowl and waders accumulate during the winter months. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit. From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through the lightly wooded triangular area north of the car park.  These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west and forming the southern boundary of the reserve (marked in green on the map). Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the pond reed bed and scrape.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 12:42
Otmoor has much to offer at all seasons. In summer breeding species include numerous warblers and Common Cuckoo, parasitizing Reed Warbler nests. Common Terns also breed.breed here, while European Turtle-doves traditionally breed but are in decline, as in most of the country. Hobbies occur regularly in spring and summer, replaced in winter by Merlins, Hen Harriers and Short-eared Owls. Waterfowl and waders accumulate during the winter months. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit. From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through the lightly wooded triangular area north of the car park.  These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west and forming the southern boundary of the reserve (marked in green on the map). Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the pond and scrape.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 12:34
Otmoor has much to offer at all seasons. In summer breeding species include numerous warblers and Common Cuckoo, parasitizing Reed Warbler nests. Common Terns also breed. Hobbies occur regularly in spring and summer, replaced in winter by Merlins, Hen Harriers and Short-eared Owls. Waterfowl and waders accumulate during the winter months. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit. From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through the lightly wooded triangular area north of the car park.  These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west and forming the southern boundary of the reserve (marked in green on the map). Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the pond and scrape.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 12:28
Otmoor has much to offer at all seasons. In summer breeding species include numerous warblers and Common Cuckoo, parasitizing Reed Warbler nests. Hobbies occur regularly in spring and summer, replaced in winter by Merlins, Hen Harriers and Short-eared Owls. Waterfowl and waders accumulate during the winter months. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit. From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through a the lightly wooded area.triangular area north of the car park.  These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west and forming the southern boundary of the reserve (marked in green on the map). Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the pond and scrape.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:49
Otmoor has much to offer at all seasons. In summer breeding species include numerous warblers and Common Cuckoo, parasitizing Reed Warbler nests. Hobbies occur regularly in spring and summer, replaced in winter by Merlins Merlins, Hen Harriers and Short-eared Owls. Waterfowl and waders accumulate during the winter months. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit. From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through a lightly wooded area.  These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west and forming the southern boundary of the reserve (marked in green on the map). Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the pond and scrape.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:44
Otmoor has much to offer at all seasons. In summer breeding species include numerous warblers and Common Cuckoo, parasitizing Reed Warbler nests. Hobbies occur regularly in spring and summer, replaced in winter by Merlins and Short-eared Owls. Owls. Waterfowl and waders accumulate during the winter months. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit. From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through a lightly wooded area.  These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west and forming the southern boundary of the reserve (marked in green on the map). Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the pond and scrape.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:13
Otmoor has much to offer at all seasons. In summer breeding species include numerous warblers and Common Cuckoo, parasitizing Reed Warbler nests. Hobbies occur regularly in spring and summer, replaced in winter by Merlins and Short-eared Owls. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit. From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through a lightly wooded area.  These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west.east-west and forming the southern boundary of the reserve (marked in green on the map). Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the pond and scrape. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit.scrape.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:44
From the car park, a bridleway leads briefly west and then north. Depending on the season, an alternative route may be available passing through a lightly wooded area.  These routes lead northwards to a long dyke running east-west. Walking westwards along the dyke provides views of the marshy fields to the north and eventually leads to a crossroads. Turning left at the crossroads leads to the central hide which offers views over the fields.  Turning right leads to the hide overlooking the pond and scrape. The walk from the car park to the last hide takes about half an hour. Allowing for birding and some time at the hides, around 2 hours are needed for a satisfactory visit.

The closest railway station is at Islip, served by trains from Oxford and Bicester. From the station one can walk to the reserve following the Oxfordshire Way via Noke and Beckley (3.3km).

Buses run from Oxford to the village of Beckley, just over a mile from the reserve entrance.

By car or bicycle, the reserve may be reached from Oxford via the village of Beckley. From the Abingdon Arms pub in Beckley, take the High Street and then Otmoor Lane which leads north to the reserve. If using navigation systems, do not use the address 'Otmoor Lane' which may lead to the wrong part of the lane. The reserve postcode is OX3 9T, the grid reference is SP570126 and the What3Words code is: dividers.sage.bibs

Cyclists should plan their route carefully to avoid major roads such as the Oxford Bypass (Ring Road).

Explain from where and how to get to this site with private and public transport.

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 12:40
The closest railway station is at Islip, served by trains from Oxford and Bicester. From the station one can walk to the reserve following the Oxfordshire Way via Noke and Beckley (3.3km). Buses run from Oxford to the village of Beckley, just over a mile from the reserve entrance. By car or bicycle, the reserve may be reached from Oxford via the village of Beckley. From the Abingdon Arms pub in Beckley, take the High Street and then Otmoor Lane which leads north to the reserve. For If using navigation systems, do not use the address 'Otmoor Lane' which may lead to the wrong part of the lane. The reserve postcode is OX3 9T, the grid reference is SP570126 and the What3Words code is: dividers.sage.bibs Cyclists should plan their route carefully to avoid major roads such as the Oxford Bypass (Ring Road).
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:40
The closest railway station is at Islip, served by trains from Oxford and Bicester. From the station one can walk to the reserve following the Oxfordshire Way via Noke and Beckley (3.3km). Buses run from Oxford to the village of Beckley, just over a mile from the reserve entrance. By car or bicycle, the reserve may be reached from Oxford via the village of Beckley. From the Abingdon Arms pub in Beckley, take the High Street and then Otmoor Lane which leads north to the reserve. For navigation systems, the reserve postcode is OX3 9T, the grid reference is SP570126 and the What3Words code is: dividers.sage.bibs Cyclists should plan their route carefully to avoid major roads such as the Oxford Bypass.Bypass (Ring Road).
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:32
The closest railway station is at Islip, served by trains from Oxford and Bicester. From the station one can walk to the reserve via following the Oxfordshire Way via Noke and Beckley (3.3km). Buses run from Oxford to the village of Beckley, just over a mile from the reserve entrance. By car or bicycle, the reserve may be reached from Oxford via the village of Beckley. From the Abingdon Arms pub in Beckley, take the High Street and then Otmoor Lane which leads north to the reserve. For navigation systems, the reserve postcode is OX3 9T, the grid reference is SP570126 and the What3Words code is: dividers.sage.bibs Cyclists should plan their route carefully to avoid major roads such as the Oxford Bypass.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:21
The closest railway station is at Islip, served by trains from Oxford and Bicester. From the station one can walk to the reserve via the Oxfordshire Way (3.3km). Buses run from Oxford to the village of Beckley, just over a mile from the reserve entrance. By car or bicycle, the reserve may be reached from Oxford via the village of Beckley. From the Abingdon Arms pub in Beckley, take the High Street and then Otmoor Lane which leads north to the reserve. For navigation systems, the reserve postcode is OX3 9T, the grid reference is SP570126 and the What3Words code is:dividers.is: dividers.sage.bibs Cyclists should plan their route carefully to avoid major roads such as the Oxford Bypass.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:35
The closest railway station is at Islip, served by trains from Oxford and Bicester. From the station one can walk to the reserve via the Oxfordshire Way (3.3km). Buses run from Oxford to the village of Beckley, just over a mile from the reserve entrance. By car or bicycle, the reserve may be reached from Oxford via the village of Beckley. From the Abingdon Arms pub in Beckley, take the High Street and then Otmoor Lane which leads north to the reserve. For navigation systems, the reserve postcode is OX3 9T, the grid reference is SP570126 and the What3Words code is:dividers.sage.bibs Cyclists should plan their route carefully to avoid major roads such as the Oxford Bypass.

The reserve is open from dawn until dusk.

The main entry point is via a small parking area just off Otmoor Lane north of Beckley. RSPB members should display a membership card for free parking, while non-members are asked to pay two pounds via an 'honesty box'. Visitors are asked not to park on Otmoor Lane.

Provide information on how to enter this site, which may include:
• entry points
• entry permits / entry tickets and fees
• opening hours / opening season
• other restrictions

Note that this section should only contain information on how to ACCESS (= enter) a site. Info on how to REACH a site should be added to "How to get there" section.

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:41
The reserve is open from dawn until dusk. The main entry point is via a small parking area just off Otmoor Lane north of Beckley. RSPB members should display a membership card for free parking, while non-members are asked to pay two pounds via an 'honesty box'. Visitors are asked not to park on Otmoor Lane.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:23
The reserve is open from dawn until dusk. The main entry point is via a small parking area just off Otmoor Lane north of Beckley. RSPB members should display membership card for free parking, while non-members are asked to pay two pounds via an 'honesty box'. Visitors are asked not to park on Otmoor Lane.

The area is rich in mammals. Introduced Muntjac Deer are common and even frequent the carpark, while Roe, Fallow and Chinese Water Deer also occur. Brown Hares are often seen, while Otters are resident.

The area has traces of Roman occupation: Otmoor Lane where the entrance lies is a Roman Road, Roman artefacts have been found on the reserve and there is a Roman villa at Islip, though little remains to be seen today.

The nearby city of Oxford is rich in cultural attractions such as the Ashmolean Museum.

Add information about other attractions at this site, including
• wildlife (apart from birds)
• sights (natural, cultural, archaeological, etc.)
• activities (e.g. for non-birding companions)

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2023-01-22 02:48
The area is rich in mammals. Introduced Muntjac Deer are common and even frequent the carpark, while Roe, Fallow and Chinese Water Deer also occur. Brown Hares are often seen, while Otters are resident but less readily seen. resident. The area has traces of Roman occupation: Otmoor Lane where the entrance lies is a Roman Road, Roman artefacts have been found on the reserve and there is a Roman villa at Islip, though little remains to be seen today. The nearby city of Oxford is rich in cultural attractions such as the Ashmolean Museum.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 13:14
The area is rich in mammals. Introduced Muntjac Deer are common and even frequent the carpark, while Roe, Fallow and Chinese Water Deer also occur. Brown Hares are often seen, while Otters are resident but less readily seen. The area has traces of Roman occupation: Otmoor Lane where the entrance lies is a Roman Road, Roman artefacts have been found on the reserve and there is a Roman villa at Islip, though little remains to be seen today. The nearby city of Oxford is rich in cultural attractions such as the Ashmolean Museum.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:59
The area is rich in mammals. Introduced Muntjac Deer are common and even frequent the carpark, while Roe, Fallow and Chinese Water Deer also occur. Brown Hares are often seen, while Otters are resident but less readily seen. The nearby city of Oxford is rich in cultural attractions such as the Ashmolean Museum.

Two comfortable hides are provided. One overlooks the lagoon and scrape in the northwest corner of the reserve. The other hide is in the centre of the reserve and overlooks the fields which are partly flooded in winter. Toilets are not currently available.

Around 1.5km away, on the way to and from the reserve, is the Abingdon Arms, a historic pub owned by a consortium of local people. It serves excellent food and sells an informative booklet, The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker.

Provide information about what type of facilities are available at
or near this site, including:
• information centers / information points
• catering
• accommodation
• hides and watchtowers
• restrooms / toilets

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-19 12:50
Two comfortable hides are provided. One overlooks the lagoon and scrape in the northwest corner of the reserve. The other hide is in the centre of the reserve and overlooks the fields which are partly flooded in winter. winter. Toilets are not currently available. Around 1.5km away, on the way to and from the reserve, is the Abingdon Arms, a historic pub owned by a consortium of local people. It serves excellent food and sells an informative booklet, The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:00
Two comfortable hides are provded.provided. One overlooks the lagoon and scrape in the northwest corner of the reserve. The other hide is in the centre of the reserve and overlooks the fields which are partly flooded in winter. Around 2km 1.5km away, on the way to and from the reserve, is the Abingdon Arms, a historic pub owned by a consortium of local people. It serves excellent food and sells an informative booklet, The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:05
Two comfortable hides are provded. One overlooks the lagoon and scrape in the northwest corner of the reserve. The other hide is in the centre of the reserve and overlooks the fields which are partly flooded in winter.winter. Around 2km away, on the way to and from the reserve, is the Abingdon Arms, a historic pub owned by a consortium of local people. It serves excellent food and sells an informative booklet, The Birds of Otmoor by Peter Barker.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 11:50
Two comfortable hides are provded. One overlooks the lagoon and scrape in the northwest corner of the reserve. The other hide is in the centre of the reserve and overlooks the fields which are partly flooded in winter.

Because adjacent land is used by the Ministry of Defense, there is regular noise pollution from shooting practice, though the birds are apparently used to the disturbance. Needless to say visitors should not even think about entering the area shaded pink/red on the map.

Are there any security issues or other annoyances at this site? For
instance, these may include:
• offenses like robbery or theft
• natural hazards
• dangerous or annoying animals or plants (mosquitoes, leaches, thorn bushes, etc.)
• noise pollution

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-15 13:47
Because adjacent land is used by the Ministry of Defense, there is regular noise pollution from shooting practice. The practice, though the birds are apparently used to the disturbance. Needless to say visitors should not even think about entering the area shaded pink/red on the map.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 13:30
Because adjacent land is used by the Ministry of Defense, there is regular noise pollution from shooting practice. The birds are apparently used to the disturbance. Needless to say one visitors should not even think about entering the area shaded pink/red on the map.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:46
Because adjacent land is used by the Ministry of Defense, there is regular noise pollution from shooting practice. The birds are apparently used to the disturbance..disturbance. Needless to say one shoould should not enter even think about entering the are area shaded pink/red on the map.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2022-11-14 12:09
Because adjacent land is used by the Ministry of Defense, there is noise pollution from shooting practice. The birds are apparently used to the disturbance..Needless to say one shoould not enter the are shaded pink/red on the map.
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