IMG
© Andrea Corso
Delete exact location

The introductory text should contain general information about the site, which may include for instance:
• geographic/ biogeographic location
• habitat and vegetation
• typical bird species/bird communities
• protection status
• land use and history
• importance for birdwatching

Coordinates were set by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) : 35.8644/12.8677 (2020-11-09 18:54:15 )

Site name was set by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) as "Linosa" (2020-11-09 18:54:15 )

Not available yet

List up to ca. 25 species that:
• have a limited distribution range and/or are rare on a global level
• are most sought-after by birdwatchers at this site
• and are relatively easy to see at this site (year-round or seasonally)

Not available yet

Linosa is Italy's premier vagrant trap and as such is best during spring and fall migration. The breeding and wintering avifauna is quite limited, so that visits at those seasons will not record many species, but there is very little data, especially for winter, so they would definitely be worthwhile. The nighttime sounds from the huge Scopoli's Shearwater colony (several thousand pairs) are a major highlight in summer and early fall.

Anytime from late February to early June could produce spring migrants, and all of the period from late August to early December is potentially good for fall migrants, but birding efforts on the island have so far concentrated on April and May in the spring, and mid-October to late November in fall. Siberian vagrants are a regular feature of fall migration, with Yellow-browed Warbler expected and sometimes even fairly common (between 20-90 each fall in recent years), while Little Bunting, Dusky Warbler, and Olive-backed Pipit are annual. The list of other Siberian vagrants is long, with megas including Pallas's Reed Bunting, Yellow-breasted Bunting (twice!), Blyth's Pipit, and Eastern Black Redstart. From North America, Red-eyed Vireo has made an appearance, and the potential is limitless. Several North African species - Moussier's Redstart, Trumpeter Finch, and 'Desert' Gray Shrike - are also regular at this season.

Spring is better for sheer numbers, and the island can be dripping with trans-Saharan migrants pretty much at any time between mid-April and mid-May. Coverage in spring has not been as intensive as in the fall, but again the rarity potential is almost limitless. In early spring (late March - early April), several Italian rarities such as Ruppell's Warbler and Semicollared Flycatcher are regular, while Isabelline Wheatear can be fairly common. Major rarities that have been documented in spring include Sooty Falcon and Atlas Flycatcher, so clearly anything can occur.

Given the nature of migration, and how time-consuming reaching the island can be, a stay of at least a week is recommended. The island is small enough (5 square km) that it can be covered entirely on foot, but there is the option of renting bicycles, electric bicycles, or scooters in town. The entire island can be good, and exploration is encouraged, but some of the areas that have consitently been productive are the gardens in town (south side of the island), the Mannarazza area in the north, the Pozzo Salito area in the middle of the island, and the open areas near the ferry landing at Pozzolana di Ponente.

Give recommendations for making your visit as productive as possible.
This may include for instance:
• best season
• best time of the day
• how much time to spend at the site
• best means of locomotion within the site
• recommended routes / areas within the site
• guiding

Edited by Ottavio Janni on 2021-12-03 08:13
Linosa is Italy's premier vagrant trap and as such is best during spring and fall migration. The breeding and wintering avifauna is quite limited, so that visits at those seasons will not record many species, but there is very little data, especially for winter, so they would definitely be worthwhile. The nighttime sounds from the huge Scopoli's Shearwater colony (several thousand pairs) are a major highlight in summer and early fall. Anytime from late February to early June could produce spring migrants, and all of the period from late August to early December is potentially good for fall migrants, but birding efforts on the island have so far concentrated on April and May in the spring, and mid-October to late November in fall. Siberian vagrants are a regular feature of fall migration, with Yellow-browed Warbler expected and sometimes even fairly common (between 20-90 each fall in recent years), while Little Bunting, Dusky Warbler, and Olive-backed Pipit are annual. The list of other Siberian vagrants is long, with megas including Pallas's Reed Bunting, Yellow-breasted Bunting (twice!).(twice!), Blyth's Pipit, and Eastern Black Redstart. From North America, Red-eyed Vireo has made an appearance, and the potential is limitless. Several North African species - Moussier's Redstart, Trumpeter Finch, and 'Desert' Gray Shrike - are also regular at this season. Spring is better for sheer numbers, and the island can be dripping with trans-Saharan migrants pretty much at any time between mid-April and mid-May. Coverage in spring has not been as intensive as in the fall, but again the rarity potential is almost limitless. In early spring (late March - early April), several Italian rarities such as Ruppell's Warbler and Semicollared Flycatcher are regular, while Isabelline Wheatear can be fairly common. Major rarities that have been documented in spring include Sooty Falcon and Atlas Flycatcher, so clearly anything can occur. Given the nature of migration, and how time-consuming reaching the island can be, a stay of at least a week is recommended. The island is small enough (5 square km) that it can be covered entirely on foot, but there is the option of renting bicycles, electric bicycles, or scooters in town. The entire island can be good, and exploration is encouraged, but some of the areas that have consitently been productive are the gardens in town (south side of the island), the Mannarazza area in the north, the Pozzo Salito area in the middle of the island, and the open areas near the ferry landing at Pozzolana di Ponente.
Edited by Ottavio Janni on 2021-12-03 07:50
Linosa is Italy's premier vagrant trap and as such is best during spring and fall migration. The breeding and wintering avifauna is quite limited, so that visits at those seasons will not record many species, but there is very little data, especially for winter, so they would definitely be worthwhile. The nighttime sounds from the huge Scopoli's Shearwater colony (several thousand pairs) are a major highlight in summer and early fall. Anytime from late February to early June could produce spring migrants, and all of the period from late August to early December is potentially good for fall migrants, but birding efforts on the island have so far concentrated on April and May in the spring, and mid-October to late November in fall. Siberian vagrants are a regular feature of fall migration, with Yellow-browed Warbler expected and sometimes even fairly common (between 20-90 each fall in recent years), while Little Bunting, Dusky Warbler, and Olive-backed Pipit are annual. The list of other Siberian vagrants is long, with megas including Pallas's Reed Bunting, Yellow-breasted Bunting (twice!). From North America, Red-eyed Vireo has made an appearance, and the potential is limitless. Several North African species - Moussier's Redstart, Trumpeter Finch, and 'Desert' Gray Shrike - are also regular at this season. Spring is better for sheer numbers, and the island can be dripping with trans-Saharan migrants pretty much at any time between mid-April and mid-May. Coverage in spring has not been as intensive as in the fall, but again the rarity potential is almost limitless. In early spring (late March - early April), several Italian rarities such as Ruppell's Warbler and Semicollared Flycatcher are regular, while Isabelline Wheatear can be fairly common. Major rarities that have been documented in spring include Sooty Falcon and Atlas Flycatcher, so clearly anything can occur. Given the nature of migration, and how time-consuming reaching the island can be, a stay of at least a week is recommended. The island is small enough (5 square km) that it can be covered entirely on foot, but there is the option of renting bicycles, electric bicycles, or scooters in town. The entire island can be good, and exploration is encouraged, but some of the areas that have consitently been productive are the gardens in town (south side of the island), the Mannarazza area in the north, the Pozzo Salito area in the middle of the island, and the open areas near the ferry landing at Pozzolana di Ponente.

As a small island, Linosa is only accessible by sea. A ferry leaves Porto Empedocle (on the Sicilian mainland near Agrigento) every night at 11 PM (except Fridays) and arrives at Linosa around 6:30 AM. The ferry then continues to the island of Lampedusa (arriving around 8:30 AM), then leaves Lampedusa at 10:45 AM to head back to Porto Empedocle, stopping once again at Linosa (12:30 PM) on the way. As such, the ferry can be used to reach Linosa from both the Sicilian mainland and from Lampedusa. The island of Lampedusa is accessible by air via daily flights from Sicily (Palermo 2-3 times a day, and Catania 2-3 times a week; from May to October there are also daily flights from several other Italian cities), and for travellers pressed for time flying to Lampedusa then taking the ferry to Linosa is the best option (as discussed below, the ferries are often cancelled due to inclement weather, but birding on Lampedusa is also excellent, so being stuck there is not the end of the world).

Another ferry leaves Porto Empedocle every morning (except Thursdays and Sundays) at 9:30, arriving at Linosa around 16:00. The ferry then continues to Lampedusa before heading back to Porto Empedocle, but it does not stop at Linosa on the way back. As such, it cannot be used to travel from Lampedusa to Linosa, but can be a convenient option for birders leaving the island at the end of their stay.

Info on ferry schedules can be found here: www.siremar.it

One important thing to keep in mind is that ferries are often cancelled due to inclement weather, sometimes for many days on end. As such, birders should make sure they include a buffer in their travel plans, as there is the very real possibility of being stuck on the island for longer than expected, or of remaining stuck on Lampedusa or mainland Sicily on the way to Linosa. As a rule of thumb, the ferry (nearly) always runs if winds are below 15-16 knots. It usually runs if winds are about 17-20 knots, but not reliably. It almost never runs if winds are above 20 knots. A good site to check is www.windfinder.com

During peak tourist season, usually from mid-May to mid-October (but the schedule changes every year, for up-to-date info see: https://www.libertylines.it/destinazioni/lampedusa/) there is also daily hydrofoil service between Lampedusa and Linosa. As the journey only takes 60-90 minutes depending on sea conditions, it is the fastest way to get to Linosa. Most years, the hydrofoil will not be running during peak birding season, but the schedule changes often so make sure to check. Like the ferry, hydrofoil service is suspended during inclement weather.

Explain from where and how to get to this site with private and public transport.

Edited by Ottavio Janni on 2021-12-03 08:03
As a small island, Linosa is only accessible by sea. A ferry leaves Porto Empedocle (on the Sicilian mainland near Agrigento) every night at 11 PM (except Fridays) and arrives at Linosa around 6:30 AM. The ferry then continues to the island of Lampedusa (arriving around 8:30 AM), then leaves Lampedusa at 10:45 AM to head back to Porto Empedocle, stopping once again at Linosa (12:30 PM) on the way. As such, the ferry can be used to reach Linosa from both the Sicilian mainland and from Lampedusa. The island of Lampedusa is accessible by air via daily flights from Sicily (Palermo 2-3 times a day, and Catania 2-3 times a week; from May to October there are also daily flights from several other Italian cities), and for travellers pressed for time flying to Lampedusa then taking the ferry to Linosa is the best option (as discussed below, the ferries are often cancelled due to inclement weather, but birding on Lampedusa is also excellent, so being stuck there is not the end of the world). Another ferry leaves Porto Empedocle every morning (except Thursdays and Sundays) at 9:30, arriving at Linosa around 16:00. The ferry then continues to Lampedusa before heading back to Porto Empedocle, but it does not stop at Linosa on the way back. As such, it cannot be used to travel from Lampedusa to Linosa, but can be a convenient option for birders leaving the island at the end of their stay. Info on ferry schedules can be found here: www.siremar.it One important thing to keep in mind is that ferries are often cancelled due to inclement weather, sometimes for many days on end. As such, birders should make sure they include a buffer in their travel plans, as there is the very real possibility of being stuck on the island for longer than expected, or of remaining stuck on Lampedusa or mainland Sicily on the way to Linosa. As a rule of thumb, the ferry (nearly) always runs if winds are below 15-16 knots. It usually runs if winds are about 17-20 knots, but not reliably. It almost never runs if winds are above 20 knots. A good site to check is www.windfinder.com During peak tourist season, usually from mid-May to mid-October (but the schedule changes every year, for up-to-date info see: https://www.libertylines.it/destinazioni/lampedusa/) there is also daily hydrofoil service between Lampedusa and Linosa. As the journey only takes 60-90 minutes depending on sea conditions, it is the fastest way to get to Linosa. Most years, the hydrofoil will not be running during peak birding season, but the schedule changes often so make sure to check. Like the ferry, hydrofoil service is suspended during inclement weather.

All of the island is freely accessible on foot, either on paved roads or hiking trails (singposted). Just make sure you respect private property.

Provide information on how to enter this site, which may include:
• entry points
• entry permits / entry tickets and fees
• opening hours / opening season
• other restrictions

Note that this section should only contain information on how to ACCESS (= enter) a site. Info on how to REACH a site should be added to "How to get there" section.

Edited by Ottavio Janni on 2021-12-03 08:07
All of the island is freely accessible on foot, either on paved roads or hiking trails (singposted). Just make sure you respect private property.

The crystal-clear water and spectacular marine life make snorkeling and swimming highly worthwhile, especially in fall when water temperatures remain above 20 degrees well into November, so make sure to bring swimming trunks and a mask.

As a migration hotspot, Linosa also attracts migratory insects, and dragonflies in particular can be very rewarding. Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens) is regular in fall, while the first and so far only record of Keyhole Glider (Tramea basilaris) for the Western Palearctic, a pair, was also from Linosa in October 2016.

Add information about other attractions at this site, including
• wildlife (apart from birds)
• sights (natural, cultural, archaeological, etc.)
• activities (e.g. for non-birding companions)

Edited by Ottavio Janni on 2021-12-03 08:12
The crystal-clear water and spectacular marine life make snorkeling and swimming highly worthwhile, especially in fall when water temperatures remain above 20 degrees well into November, so make sure to bring swimming trunks and a mask. As a migration hotspot, Linosa also attracts migratory insects, and dragonflies in particular can be very rewarding. Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens) is regular in fall, while the first and so far only record of Keyhole Glider (Tramea basilaris) for the Western Palearctic, a pair, was also from Linosa in October 2016.

Most visitors to Linosa stay in private homes rented out by the islanders, and this is the best option. Fabio Tuccio (www.linosa.biz) is an excellent contact.

Provide information about what type of facilities are available at
or near this site, including:
• information centers / information points
• catering
• accommodation
• hides and watchtowers
• restrooms / toilets

Edited by Ottavio Janni on 2021-12-03 08:15
Most visitors to Linosa stay in private homes rented out by the islanders, and this is the best option. Fabio Tuccio (www.linosa.biz) is an excellent contact.

Are there any security issues or other annoyances at this site? For
instance, these may include:
• offenses like robbery or theft
• natural hazards
• dangerous or annoying animals or plants (mosquitoes, leaches, thorn bushes, etc.)
• noise pollution

Not available yet
All information about this site was contributed by Orniverse users. Neither Orniverse nor the contributors accept responsibility for the completeness and accuracy of the information provided.

Local guides


Profile picture Andrea Corso

Reports

Season:
to
Species:
no reports found
Orniverse: Linosa - Italy