IMG
© Eric Hope

Grand Teton NP

43.82016 , -110.68314

United States Of America

Grand Teton National Park is one of the crown jewels of the US National Park System located in northwestern Wyoming. Encompassing over 300,000 acres (1,300 square kilometers), the area centers around the magnificent Teton Range and Jackson Hole. Here you will find a high sagebrush desert below towering alpine and mixed-conifer forest communities abounding with riparian areas in between. This diversity in habitat makes it ideal for different Intermountain West specialties from greater-sage grouse in the plains to black rosy-finch in the high peaks.

Delete exact location

The introductory text should contain general information about the site, which may include for instance:
• geographic/ biogeographic location
• habitat and vegetation
• typical bird species/bird communities
• protection status
• land use and history
• importance for birdwatching

Coordinates were set by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) : 43.8202/-110.6831 (2020-11-21 18:59:31 )

Site name was set by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) as "Grand Teton NP" (2020-11-21 18:59:31 )

Edited by Eric Hope on 2021-12-31 23:45:50
Grand Teton National Park is one of the crown jewels of the US National Park System located in northwestern Wyoming.northwestern Wyoming. Encompassing over 300,000 acres (1,300 square kilometers), the area centers around the magnificent Teton Range and Jackson Hole. Here you will find a high sagebrush desert below towering alpine and mixed-conifer forest communities abounding with riparian areas in between. This diversity in habitat makes it ideal for different Intermountain West specialties from greater-sage grouse in the plains to black rosy-finch in the high peaks.
Edited by Eric Hope on 2021-12-31 23:45:22
Grand Teton National Park is one of the crown jewels of the US National Park System in northwestern Wyoming. Encompassing over 300,000 acres (1,300 square kilometers), the area centers around the magnificent Teton Range and Jackson Hole. Here you will find a high sagebrush desert below towering alpine and mixed-conifer forest communities abounding with riparian areas in between. This diversity in habitat makes it ideal for different Intermountain West specialties from greater-sage grouse in the plains to black rosy-finch in the high peaks.

List up to ca. 25 species that:
• have a limited distribution range and/or are rare on a global level
• are most sought-after by birdwatchers at this site
• and are relatively easy to see at this site (year-round or seasonally)

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator)
Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus)
Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)
Dusky Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus)
Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus)
American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos)
Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa)
Williamson's Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus thyroideus)
Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis)
American Three-toed Woodpecker (Picoides dorsalis)
Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus)
Pacific Wren (Troglodytes pacificus)
American Dipper (Cinclus mexicanus)
Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus)
Pine Grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator)
Black Rosy-Finch (Leucosticte atrata)
Cassin's Finch (Haemorhous cassinii)
Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri)

Pacific Wren (Troglodytes pacificus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-12-29 20:28:22)

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-12-22 23:51:12)

Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-25 18:29:53)

Pine Grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-25 18:29:40)

Williamson's Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus thyroideus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-25 18:24:44)

Cassin's Finch (Haemorhous cassinii) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-25 00:17:23)

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:50:35)

Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:36:47)

American Dipper (Cinclus mexicanus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:34:32)

Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:34:12)

Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:33:59)

Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:33:49)

Black Rosy-Finch (Leucosticte atrata) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:22:31)

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:21:53)

Dusky Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:21:42)

American Three-toed Woodpecker (Picoides dorsalis) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:21:32)

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:21:24)

Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was added by Eric Hope (2021-08-24 23:21:12)

The best access to the park is from May 1 to October 31 when most park roads should be open (snowfall may close sections of roads even during the summer months). 

Spring migration is generally lackluster for songbirds that don't breed in the area because many areas are still covered in snow, but waterfowl migration can be surprisingly good - especially if you can find open holes in the otherwise frozen Jackson Lake in April.

Summer is a great time to find all the intermountain west specialties on breeding grounds. There isn't an abundance of diversity like some other areas in the US, but what does breed here may be found in abundance in appropriate habitat.

Fall Migration is far-and-away more diverse than spring given far more opportunities for gleaning and seed-eating migrants on land and ample shorebird and waterfowl habitat that is absent in spring. 

Give recommendations for making your visit as productive as possible.
This may include for instance:
• best season
• best time of the day
• how much time to spend at the site
• best means of locomotion within the site
• recommended routes / areas within the site
• guiding

Edited by Eric Hope on 2021-12-31 23:52
The best access to the park is from May 1 to October 31 when most park roads should be open (snowfall may close sections of roads even during the summer months).  Spring migration is generally lackluster for songbirds that don't breed in the area because many areas are still covered in snow, but waterfowl migration can be surprisingly good - especially if you can find open holes in the otherwise frozen Jackson Lake in April. Summer is a great time to find all the intermountain west specialties on breeding grounds. There isn't an abundance of diversity like some other areas in the US, but what does breed here may be found in abundance in appropriate habitat. Fall Migration is far-and-away more diverse than spring given far more opportunities for gleaning and seed-eating migrants on land and ample shorebird and waterfowl habitat that is absent in spring. 

There are four major entrances to Grand Teton National Park via: Jackson, WY to the south; Teton Village/Wilson, WY to the southwest; Yellowstone National Park to the north; and Moran, WY to the east. 

The most-used airports to access the park are in: Jackson, WY and Salt Lake City, UT.

Explain from where and how to get to this site with private and public transport.

Edited by Eric Hope on 2021-12-31 23:58
There are four major entrances to Grand Teton National Park via: Jackson, WY to the south; Teton Village/Wilson, WY to the southwest; Yellowstone National Park to the north; and Moran, WY to the east.  The most-used airports to access the park are in: Jackson, WY and Salt Lake City, UT.

Grand Teton National Park is open year round but there are several seasonal road closures, especially in winter and spring. A $40 weekly pass is available at each entrance station and an Interagency Annual Pass ($80) or Lifetime Pass - either an Access Pass (free) for the permanently disabled or a Senior Pass ($80) for those age 62+ - will grant access to an entire carload of visitors to the park during your visit. 

Note that the park cannot be accessed via Yellowstone National Park and the North Entrance between mid-october (variable closing date due to snowfall) and Memorial Day Weekend when the road through Yellowstone experiences its annual winter closure.

Winter Closures within the park include: The Teton Park Road (closed from November 1 - April 30) and the Moose-Wilson Road (closed from November 1 - mid-May). Road status may change throughout the summer months and accurate current status information may be found here.

Provide information on how to enter this site, which may include:
• entry points
• entry permits / entry tickets and fees
• opening hours / opening season
• other restrictions

Note that this section should only contain information on how to ACCESS (= enter) a site. Info on how to REACH a site should be added to "How to get there" section.

Edited by Eric Hope on 2022-01-01 00:05
Grand Teton National Park is open year round but there are several seasonal road closures, especially in winter and spring. A $40 weekly pass is available at each entrance station and an Interagency Annual Pass ($80) or Lifetime Pass - either an Access Pass (free) for the permanently disabled or a Senior Pass ($80) for those age 62+ - will grant access to an entire carload of visitors to the park during your visit.  Note that the park cannot be accessed via Yellowstone National Park and the North Entrance between mid-october (variable closing date due to snowfall) and Memorial Day Weekend when the road through Yellowstone experiences its annual winter closure. Winter Closures within the park include: The Teton Park Road (closed from November 1 - April 30) and the Moose-Wilson Road (closed from November 1 - mid-May). Road status may change throughout the summer months and accurate current status information may be found here.

Wildlife: Grand Teton National Park lies within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, often regarded as the "Seregeti of the West" with some of the highest concentrations of charasmatic megafauna in the United States. Some of the more popular to observe include: bison, elk, bighorn sheep, moose, grizzly and black bears, gray wolves, and more.

Other Attractions: There are many other attractions in Grand Teton National Park including: hundreds of miles of hiking trails, several waterfalls (like the popular Hidden Falls), the popular Jenny Lake boat tours and shuttle, endless mountaineering opportunities, and several historic buildings and visitor centers with interpretive matierals for all ages.

Add information about other attractions at this site, including
• wildlife (apart from birds)
• sights (natural, cultural, archaeological, etc.)
• activities (e.g. for non-birding companions)

Edited by Eric Hope on 2022-01-01 00:09
Wildlife: Grand Teton National Park lies within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, often regarded as the "Seregeti of the West" with some of the highest concentrations of charasmatic megafauna in the United States. Some of the more popular to observe include: bison, elk, bighorn sheep, moose, grizzly and black bears, gray wolves, and more. Other Attractions: There are many other attractions in Grand Teton National Park including: hundreds of miles of hiking trails, several waterfalls (like the popular Hidden Falls), the popular Jenny Lake boat tours and shuttle, endless mountaineering opportunities, and several historic buildings and visitor centers with interpretive matierals for all ages.

There are several hotels and campgrounds in the park but reservations should be made well in advance of your visit in order to secure accomodations. There are also many options outside the park as well in the towns of: Jackson, Wilson, and Teton Village.

The main visitor centers are located at: Moose, Jenny Lake, and Colter Bay. There are additional information facilities and/or museums located at: the National Elk Refuge, Signal Mountain, Jackson Lake Lodge, and Flagg Ranch (just north of the park).

Most accomodations and dining facilities are centered around the more popular visitation hotspots in the park including: Moose, Jenny Lake, Jackson Lake (including Colter Bay, Leeks Marina, Signal Mountain, and Jackson Lake Lodge), and Flagg Ranch (located just north of the park). These areas have running water facilities in addition to restaurants, accomodations, and convenience stores. There are also a number of picnic areas and trailheads throughout the park which almost all have pit toilet access.

Provide information about what type of facilities are available at
or near this site, including:
• information centers / information points
• catering
• accommodation
• hides and watchtowers
• restrooms / toilets

Edited by Eric Hope on 2022-01-01 00:45
There are several hotels and campgrounds in the park but reservations should be made well in advance of your visit in order to secure accomodations. There are also many options outside the park as well in the towns of: Jackson, Wilson, and Teton Village. The main visitor centers are located at: Moose, Jenny Lake, and Colter Bay. There are additional information facilities and/or museums located at: the National Elk Refuge, Signal Mountain, Jackson Lake Lodge, and Flagg Ranch (just north of the park). Most accomodations and dining facilities are centered around the more popular visitation hotspots in the park including: Moose, Jenny Lake, Jackson Lake (including Colter Bay, Leeks Marina, Signal Mountain, and Jackson Lake Lodge), and Flagg Ranch (located just north of the park). These areas have running water facilities in addition to restaurants, accomodations, and convenience stores. There are also a number of picnic areas and trailheads throughout the park which almost all have pit toilet access.

It is incredibly unwise to bird anywhere in Grand Teton without bear spray as grizzlies are encountered even in the busiest tourist locations. Because of a number of dangerous wildlife species in high numbers throughout the park, making noise to avoid surprise interactions is imperative (avoiding the temptation to bird silently is best).

Are there any security issues or other annoyances at this site? For
instance, these may include:
• offenses like robbery or theft
• natural hazards
• dangerous or annoying animals or plants (mosquitoes, leaches, thorn bushes, etc.)
• noise pollution

Edited by Eric Hope on 2021-12-29 20:23
It is incredibly unwise to bird anywhere in Grand Teton without bear spray as grizzlies are encountered even in the busiest tourist locations. Because of a number of dangerous wildlife species in high numbers throughout the park, making noise to avoid surprise interactions is imperative (avoiding the temptation to bird silently is best).
All information about this site was contributed by Orniverse users. Neither Orniverse nor the contributors accept responsibility for the completeness and accuracy of the information provided.

Local guides


Profile picture Eric Hope

Gallery


Reports

Season:
to
Species:
no reports found
Orniverse: Grand Teton NP - United States of America