IMG
© Stephen Matthews

Tai Po Kau NR

22.42575 , 114.18121

Hong Kong

Undoubtedly Hong Kong's finest site for forest birds, Tai Po Kau is one of the most productive birding venues in the territory, with around 250 species recorded. It is also one of Hong Kong's wilder places, where the call of the Crested Serpent Eagle can be heard regularly.

By the early 20th Century much of Hong Kong's forest had been harvested for fuel and building, leaving most hillsides bare. Replanting of the area began in 1926 when the colonial government began afforestation in the New Territories. As the replanted forest has matured, a series of species have colonised (or re-colonised) the central New Territories. The latest bird to take up residence is the Chinese Barbet, a resident of southern China which has apparently spread eastward from Guangxi. According to local expert Richard Lewthwaite, the presence of Chinese Barbets is an indicator of forest quality and the species needs mature forest (with dead trees for nesting holes). It has been seen (or heard) in and around Tai Po Kau since 2014. Today its call resounds around Tai Po Kau in spring. Similarly, both Bay Woodpecker and Speckled Piculet are now residents and increasing in number. Other recent immigrant species include Huet's Fulvetta, Mountain and Chestnut bulbuls, Hainan Blue and Brown-breasted flycatchers. Hainan Blue flycatchers now breed regularly and Hodgon's Hawk Cuckoos parasitise their nests.

Several introduced species including Silver-eared Mesia, Blue-winged Minla and Velvet-fronted Nuthatch have established themselves here and elsewhere in the New Territories. These populations derive from escaped cage birds and/or birds released throught the Buddhist practice of 'mercy release'. Other species such as Red-billed Leiothrix and Yellow-cheeked Tit might have been introduced and/or spread naturally.

Delete exact location

The introductory text should contain general information about the site, which may include for instance:
• geographic/ biogeographic location
• habitat and vegetation
• typical bird species/bird communities
• protection status
• land use and history
• importance for birdwatching

Coordinates were set by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) : 22.4257/114.1812 (2020-12-26 20:53:14 )

Site name was set by Mathias Ritschard (Admin) as "Tai Po Kau NR" (2020-12-26 20:53:14 )

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 12:19:24
Undoubtedly the Hong Kong's finest site for forest birds, Tai Po Kau is one of the most productive birding sites venues in Hong Kong, the territory, with around 250 species recorded. It is also one of Hong Kong's wilder places, where the call of the Crested Serpent Eagle can be heard regularly. By the early 20th Century much of Hong Kong's forest had been harvested for fuel and building, leaving most hillsides bare. Replanting of the area began in 1926 when the colonial government began afforestation in the New Territories. As the replanted forest has matured, a series of species have colonised (or re-colonised) the central New Territories. The latest bird to take up residence is the Chinese Barbet, a resident of southern China which has apparently spread eastward from Guangxi. According to local expert Richard Lewthwaite, the presence of Chinese Barbets is an indicator of forest quality and the species needs mature forest (with dead trees for nesting holes). It has been seen (or heard) in and around Tai Po Kau since 2014. Today its call resounds around Tai Po Kau in spring. Similarly, both Bay Woodpecker and Speckled Piculet are now residents and increasing in number. Other recent immigrant species include Huet's Fulvetta, Mountain and Chestnut bulbuls, Hainan Blue and Brown-breasted flycatchers. Hainan Blue flycatchers now breed regularly and Hodgon's Hawk Cuckoos parasitise their nests. Several introduced species including Silver-eared Mesia, Blue-winged Minla and Velvet-fronted Nuthatch have established themselves here and elsewhere in the New Territories. These populations derive from escaped cage birds and/or birds released throught the Buddhist practice of 'mercy release'. Other species such as Red-billed Leiothrix and Yellow-cheeked Tit might have been introduced and/or spread naturally.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 07:48:24
Undoubtedly the best finest site for forest birds, Tai Po Kau is one of the most productive birding sites in Hong Kong, with around 250 species recorded. It is also one of Hong Kong's wilder places, where the call of the Crested Serpent Eagle can be heard regularly. By the early 20th Century much of Hong Kong's forest had been harvested for fuel and building, leaving most hillsides bare. Replanting of the area began in 1926 when the colonial government began afforestation in the New Territories. As the replanted forest has matured, a series of species have colonised (or re-colonised) the central New Territories. The latest bird to take up residence is the Chinese Barbet, a resident of southern China which has apparently spread eastward from Guangxi. According to local expert Richard Lewthwaite, the presence of Chinese Barbets is an indicator of forest quality and the species needs mature forest (with dead trees for nesting holes). It has been seen (or heard) in and around Tai Po Kau since 2014. Today its call resounds around Tai Po Kau in spring. Similarly, both Bay Woodpecker and Speckled Piculet are now residents and increasing in number. Other recent immigrant species include Huet's Fulvetta, Mountain and Chestnut bulbuls, Hainan Blue and Brown-breasted flycatchers. Hainan Blue flycatchers now breed regularly and Hodgon's Hawk Cuckoos parasitise their nests. Several introduced species including Silver-eared Mesia, Blue-winged Minla and Velvet-fronted Nuthatch have established themselves here and elsewhere in the New Territories. These populations derive from escaped cage birds and/or birds released throught the Buddhist practice of 'mercy release'. Other species such as Red-billed Leiothrix and Yellow-cheeked Tit might have been introduced and/or spread naturally.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 02:28:17
Undoubtedly the best site for forest birds, Tai Po Kau is one of the most productive birding sites in Hong Kong, with around 250 species recorded. It is also one of Hong Kong's wilder places, where the call of the Crested Serpent Eagle can be heard regularly. By the early 20th Century much of Hong Kong's forest had been harvested for fuel and building, leaving most hillsides bare. Replanting of the area began in 1926 when the colonial government began afforestation in the New Territories. As the replanted forest has matured, a series of species have colonised (or re-colonised) the central New Territories. The latest bird to take up residence is the Chinese Barbet, a resident of southern China which has apparently spread eastward from Guangxi. According to local expert Richard Lewthwaite, the presence of Chinese Barbets is an indicator of forest quality and the species needs mature forest (with dead trees for nesting holes). It has been seen (or heard) in and around Tai Po Kau since 2014. Today its call resounds around Tai Po Kau in spring. Similarly, both Bay Woodpecker and Speckled Piculet are now residents and increasing in number. Other recent immigrant species include Huet's Fulvetta, Mountain and Chestnut bulbuls, Hainan Blue and Brown-breasted flycatchers. Hainan Blue flycatchers now breed regularly and Hodgon's Hawk Cuckoos parasitise their nests. Several introduced species including Red-billed Leiothrix, Silver-eared Mesia, Blue-winged Minla and Velvet-fronted Nuthatch have established themselves here and elsewhere in the New Territories. These populations derive from escaped cage birds and/or birds released throught the Buddhist practice of 'mercy release'. Other species such as yellow-cheeked tit are thought to Red-billed Leiothrix and Yellow-cheeked Tit might have been introduced, but might also have introduced and/or spread naturally.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 01:51:14
Undoubtedly the best site for forest birds, Tai Po Kau is one of the most productive birding sites in Hong Kong, with around 250 species recorded. It is also one of Hong Kong's wilder places, where the call of the Crested Serpent Eagle can be heard regularly. By the early 20th Century much of Hong Kong's forest had been harvested for fuel and building, leaving most hillsides bare. Replanting of the area began in 1926 when the colonial government began afforestation in the New Territories. As the replanted forest has matured, a series of species have colonised (or re-colonised) the central New Territories. The latest bird to take up residence is the Chinese Barbet, a resident of southern China which has apparently spread eastward from Guangxi. According to local expert Richard Lewthwaite, the presence of Chinese Barbets is an indicator of forest quality and the species needs mature forest (with dead trees for nesting holes). It has been seen (or heard) in and around Tai Po Kau since 2014. Today its call resounds around Tai Po Kau in spring. Similarly, both Bay Woodpecker and Speckled Piculet are now residents and increasing in number. Other recent immigrant species include Huet's Fulvetta, Mountain and Chestnut bulbuls, Hainan Blue and Brown-breasted flycatchers. Hainan Blue flycatchers now breed regularly and Hodgon's Hawk Cuckoos parasitise their nests.nests. Several introduced species including Red-billed Leiothrix, Silver-eared Mesia, Blue-winged Minla and Velvet-fronted Nuthatch have established themselves here and elsewhere in the New Territories. These populations derive from escaped cage birds and/or birds released throught the Buddhist practice of 'mercy release'. Other species such as yellow-cheeked tit are thought to have been introduced, but might also have spread naturally.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 13:13:16
Undoubtedly the best place to see site for forest birds, Tai Po Kau is one of the most productive birding sites in Hong Kong, with around 250 species recorded. It is also one of Hong Kong's wilder places, where the call of the Crested Serpent Eagle can be heard regularly. By the early 20th Century much of Hong Kong's forest had been harvested for fuel and building, leaving most hillsides bare. Replanting of the area began in 1926 when the colonial government began afforestation in the New Territories. As the replanted forest has matured, a series of species have colonised (or re-colonised) the central New Territories. The latest bird to take up residence is the Chinese Barbet, a resident of southern China which has apparently spread eastward from Guangxi. According to local expert Richard Lewthwaite, the presence of Chinese Barbets is an indicator of forest quality and the species needs mature forest (with dead trees for nesting holes). It has been seen (or heard) in and around Tai Po Kau since 2014. Today its call resounds around Tai Po Kau in spring. Similarly, both Bay Woodpecker and Speckled Piculet are now residents and increasing in number. Other recent immigrant species include Huet's Fulvetta, Mountain and Chestnut bulbuls, Hainan Blue and Brown-breasted flycatchers. Hainan Blue flycatchers now breed regularly and Hodgon's Hawk Cuckoos parasitise their nests. Other species such as yellow-cheeked tit are thought to have been introduced, but might also have spread naturally.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 11:27:06
Undoubtedly the best place to see forest birds, Tai Po Kau is one of the most productive birding sites in Hong Kong, with around 250 species recorded. It is also one of Hong Kong's wilder places, where the call of the Crested Serpent Eagle. Eagle can be heard regularly. By the early 20th Century much of Hong Kong's forest had been harvested for fuel and building, leaving most hillsides bare. Replanting of the area began in 1926 when the colonial government began afforestation in the New Territories. As the replanted forest has matured, a series of species have colonised (or re-colonised) the central New Territories. The latest bird to take up residence is the Chinese Barbet, a resident of southern China which has apparently spread eastward from Guangxi. According to local expert Richard Lewthwaite, the presence of Chinese Barbets is an indicator of forest quality and the species needs mature forest (with dead trees for nesting holes). It has been seen (or heard) in and around Tai Po Kau since 2014. Today its call resounds around Tai Po Kau in spring. Similarly, both Bay Woodpecker and Speckled Piculet are now residents and increasing in number. Other recent immigrant species include Huet's fulvetta, Fulvetta, Mountain and Chestnut bulbuls, Hainan Blue and Brown-breasted flycatchers.flycatchers. Hainan Blue flycatchers now breed regularly and Hodgon's Hawk Cuckoos parasitise their nests. Other species such as yellow-cheeked tit are thought to have been introduced, but might also have spread naturally.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:43:50
Undoubtedly the best place to see forest birds, Tai Po Kau is one of the most productive birding sites in Hong Kong, with around 250 species recorded. It is also one of Hong Kong's wilder places, the call of the Crested Serpent Eagle. By the early 20th Century much of Hong Kong's forest had been harvested for fuel and building, leaving most hillsides bare. Replanting of the area began in 1926 when the colonial government began afforestation in the New Territories. As the replanted forest has matured, a series of species have colonised (or re-colonised) the central New Territories. The latest bird to take up residence is the Chinese Barbet, a resident of southern China which has apparently spread eastward from Guangxi. According to local expert Richard Lewthwaite, the presence of Chinese Barbets is an indicator of forest quality and the species needs mature forest (with dead trees for nesting holes). It has been seen (or heard) in and around Tai Po Kau since 2014. Today its call resounds around Tai Po Kau in spring. Similarly, both Bay Woodpecker and Speckled Piculet are now residents and increasing in number. Other recent immigrant species include Huet's fulvetta, Mountain and Chestnut bulbuls, Hainan Blue and Brown-breasted flycatchers. Other species such as yellow-cheeked tit are thought to have been introduced, but might also have spread naturally.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:08:46
Today they were visited by orange-bellied leafbirds, fork-tailed sunbirds, whiteyes and cinerous tits. While leafbirds are primarily there for the nectar, one was observed to be consuming an insect (apparently with some difficulty: perhaps it was a bee which first had to be disarmed).
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:01:10
Today they were visited by orange-bellied leafbirds, fork-tailed sunbirds, whiteyes and cinerous tits. While leafbirds are primarily there for the nectar, one was observed to be consuming an insect (apparently with some difficulty: perhaps it was a bee which first had to be disarmed).

List up to ca. 25 species that:
• have a limited distribution range and/or are rare on a global level
• are most sought-after by birdwatchers at this site
• and are relatively easy to see at this site (year-round or seasonally)

Hodgson's Hawk-Cuckoo (Hierococcyx nisicolor)
Crested Serpent-Eagle (Spilornis cheela)
Crested Goshawk (Accipiter trivirgatus)
Great Barbet (Psilopogon virens)
Chinese Barbet (Psilopogon faber)
Speckled Piculet (Picumnus innominatus)
Bay Woodpecker (Blythipicus pyrrhotis)
Gray-chinned Minivet (Pericrocotus solaris)
White-bellied Erpornis (Erpornis zantholeuca)
Ashy Drongo (Dicrurus leucophaeus)
Gray-headed Canary-Flycatcher (Culicicapa ceylonensis)
Pygmy Cupwing (Pnoepyga pusilla)
Chestnut Bulbul (Hemixos castanonotus)
Mountain Bulbul (Ixos mcclellandii)
Mountain Tailorbird (Phyllergates cucullatus)
Indochinese Yuhina (Staphida torqueola)
Huet's Fulvetta (Alcippe hueti)
Dark-sided Flycatcher (Muscicapa sibirica)
Brown-breasted Flycatcher (Muscicapa muttui)
Hainan Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis hainanus)
Lesser Shortwing (Brachypteryx leucophris)
Red-flanked Bluetail (Tarsiger cyanurus)
Plain Flowerpecker (Dicaeum minullum)
Mrs. Gould's Sunbird (Aethopyga gouldiae)
Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii)

Mountain Tailorbird (Phyllergates cucullatus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-21 08:00:33)

Mrs. Gould's Sunbird (Aethopyga gouldiae) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-04 14:47:17)

Gray-headed Canary-Flycatcher (Culicicapa ceylonensis) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 13:12:26)

Gray-chinned Minivet (Pericrocotus solaris) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:52:20)

Crested Goshawk (Accipiter trivirgatus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:48:58)

Ashy Drongo (Dicrurus leucophaeus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:30:47)

Red-flanked Bluetail (Tarsiger cyanurus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:30:29)

Dark-sided Flycatcher (Muscicapa sibirica) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:20:23)

Lesser Shortwing (Brachypteryx leucophris) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:19:33)

Plain Flowerpecker (Dicaeum minullum) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:08:21)

Brown-breasted Flycatcher (Muscicapa muttui) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:07:27)

Indochinese Yuhina (Staphida torqueola) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:06:29)

Chestnut Bulbul (Hemixos castanonotus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:05:15)

Mountain Bulbul (Ixos mcclellandii) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:04:49)

Pygmy Cupwing (Pnoepyga pusilla) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:04:18)

Hainan Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis hainanus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:03:40)

Huet's Fulvetta (Alcippe hueti) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:03:22)

White-bellied Erpornis (Erpornis zantholeuca) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:03:07)

Speckled Piculet (Picumnus innominatus) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:01:52)

Bay Woodpecker (Blythipicus pyrrhotis) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:01:33)

Hodgson's Hawk-Cuckoo (Hierococcyx nisicolor) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:01:21)

Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 12:00:55)

Crested Serpent-Eagle (Spilornis cheela) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 11:52:59)

Great Barbet (Psilopogon virens) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 11:52:38)

Chinese Barbet (Psilopogon faber) was added by Stephen Matthews (2021-09-01 11:52:23)

Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest.

Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed).

A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but marked on the map by a black dot) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species.

If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to:

(a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. A range of species such as Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here.

(b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here.

(c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds (sometimes including Mrs Gould's Sunbird), especially from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering.

Tai Po Kau can be a frustrating place as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (especially for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.

PRO TIP: Many experienced birders in Hong Kong, when they visit Tai Po Kau, would go back and forth between Picnic Sites 1 and 2, half-expecting that what have come to twitch (usually a rare wintering warbler) will turn up in a 'bird wave' in that very part of the forest. This strategy seems to work well for the less assiduous. 

Give recommendations for making your visit as productive as possible.
This may include for instance:
• best season
• best time of the day
• how much time to spend at the site
• best means of locomotion within the site
• recommended routes / areas within the site
• guiding

Edited by Twq Ywq on 2021-10-08 15:10
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but marked on the map by a black dot) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. A range of species such as Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds (sometimes including Mrs Gould's Sunbird), especially from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Po Kau can be a frustrating place as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (especially for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds. PRO TIP: Many experienced birders in Hong Kong, when they visit Tai Po Kau, would go back and forth between Picnic Sites 1 and 2, half-expecting that what have come to twitch (usually a rare wintering warbler) will turn up in a 'bird wave' in that very part of the forest. This strategy seems to work well for the less assiduous. 
Edited by Twq Ywq on 2021-10-08 15:08
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but marked on the map by a black dot) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. A range of species such as Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds (sometimes including Mrs Gould's Sunbird), especially from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be a frustrating place as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (especially for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.tailorbirds. PRO TIP: Many experienced birders in Hong Kong, when they visit Tai Po Kau, would go back and forth between Picnic Sites 1 and 2, half-expecting that what have come to twitch (usually a rare wintering warbler) will turn up in a 'bird wave' in that very part of the forest. This strategy seems to work well for the less assiduous. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-22 02:23
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but marked on the map by a black dot) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. A range of species such as Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds (sometimes including Mrs Gould's Sunbird), especially from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be a frustrating place as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (especially for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-21 02:14
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but marked on the map by a black dot) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds (sometimes including Mrs Gould's Sunbird), especially from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be a frustrating place as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (for (especially for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 09:29
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown marked on the map) map by a black dot) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds (sometimes including Mrs Gould's Sunbird), especially from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be a frustrating place as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-04 15:25
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown on the map) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds (sometimes including Mrs Gould's Sunbird), especially from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be a frustrating place as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-04 14:48
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown on the map) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds (someintes (sometimes including Mrs Gould's Sunbird), especially from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-04 14:46
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown on the map) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing leafbirds and sunbirds and leafbirds, (someintes including Gould's Sunbird), especially in spring from January to March when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 02:10
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown on the map) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out fruiting fig trees (for barbets) and flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 01:59
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires calls for at least two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown on the map) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 00:22
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk (a 3 km loop) which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown on the map) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the area beside along the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be are often difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 13:10
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders aim to start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown on the map) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: can choose to: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk area beside the stream ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:47
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut (not signposted, but shown on the map) leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. One solution is to seek out flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:33
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One solution is to seek out flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. The other Another solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:19
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One is to seek out flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. The other solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed and other leaf warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Rufous-capped Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:18
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One is to seek out flowering trees which attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. The other solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or Blue Walk, or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Indochinese Yuhina, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Indochinese Yuhina, Rufous-capped Babblers, Babbler, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:09
Like other sites in Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the Red Walk which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at the warden's hut and toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One is to seek out flowering trees, trees which will usually attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. pollination. The other solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Indochinese Yuhina, Rufous-capped Babblers, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:25
Like other sites in Hog Hong Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the 'red' route Red Walk which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at te the warden's hut and tolie toilet block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the red route Red Walk which is useful if time is short. The blue walk Blue Walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One is to seek out flowering trees, which will usually attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. The other solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Indochinese Yuhina, Rufous-capped Babblers, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:10
Like other sites in Hog Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the 'red' route which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at te warden's hut and tolie block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the red route which is useful if time is short. The blue walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved rad road and turn right again down the steps at the Education Centre. This leads These lead to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be difficult to see. Great Barbets, for example, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One is to seek out flowering trees, which will usually attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. The other solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, Scarlet and Grey-chinned minivets, Yellow-browed warblers, Yellow-crested tit, White-bellied erpornis, Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Indochinese Yuhina, Rufous-capped Babblers, Common and Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:08
Like other sites in Hog Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the 'red' route which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at te warden's hut and tolie block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the red route which is useful if time is short. The blue walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved rad and right again at the Education Centre. This leads to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be diffirult difficult to see. GRet Bearbts, Great Barbets, for exmaple, example, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One is to seek out flowering trees, which will usually attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. The other solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. A single flock today contained at least 9 species: chestnut In winter such flocks may contain Chestnut as well as Light-vented bulbuls, scarlet Scarlet and grey-chinned Grey-chinned minivets, yellow-browed Yellow-browed warblers, yellow-crested Yellow-crested tit, white-bellied White-bellied erpornis, velvet-fronted Velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta and a grey-headed canary flycatcher. A second flock included several fulvetta, Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher, Indochinese yuhina, rufous-capped babblers, common Yuhina, Rufous-capped Babblers, Common and mountain tailorbirds as well as more chestnut bulbuls. Pleasing to report that there were many more chestnut bulbuls in the forest than red-whiskered or Chinese bulbuls. Many of these species have recolonized Hong Kong following the regrowth of secondary forests, with Tai Po Kau being the most mature such site. To some extent the resulting avifauna may be representative of Hong Kong before its historical deforestation.  Mountain tailorbirds.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:02
Like other sites in Hog Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the 'red' route which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at te warden's hut and tolie block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the red route which is useful if time is short. short. The blue walk is at a higher level, offering a longer walk but a generally similar set of species. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested Tit, Plain Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen from here. (b) turn left at the warden's hut and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers according to the season, Mountain and Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved rad and right again at the Education Centre. This leads to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for photographing sunbirds and leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be diffirult to see. GRet Bearbts, for exmaple, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One is to seek out flowering trees, which will usually attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. The other solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. A single flock today contained at least 9 species: chestnut bulbuls, scarlet and grey-chinned minivets, yellow-browed warblers, yellow-crested tit, white-bellied erpornis, velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta and a grey-headed canary flycatcher. A second flock included several Indochinese yuhina, rufous-capped babblers, common and mountain tailorbirds as well as more chestnut bulbuls. Pleasing to report that there were many more chestnut bulbuls in the forest than red-whiskered or Chinese bulbuls. Many of these species have recolonized Hong Kong following the regrowth of secondary forests, with Tai Po Kau being the most mature such site. To some extent the resulting avifauna may be representative of Hong Kong before its historical deforestation.  
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:00
Like other sites in Hog Kong, Tai Po Kau is most rewarding from September to May. In the summer months heat and humidity make it less appealing and the variety of species is less, although breeding birds such as Chinese Barbet, Brown-breasted and Hainan Blue flycatchers are certainly of interest. Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the 'red' route which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. Starting at te warden's hut and tolie block, one can follow this circuit in either direction, though most walkers turn left at the warden's hut and continue clockwise. There is a short cut leading across the stream to the red route which is useful if time is short. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested tit, Tit, Plain flowerpecker Flowerpecker, Chinese Barbet and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen frmo from here. (b) turn left at the wrdne's warden's hut nad and explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers acording according to the season, Mountain and CHestnut bulbuls Chestnut Bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved rad and right again at the Education cAntre. THis Centre. This leads to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for hatogaing sunbairds photographing sunbirds and leafbirds. leafbirds, especially in spring when their favourite food plants (coral trees and rhodoleia) are flowering. Tai Pao Kau can be frustrating as the birds can be diffirult to see. GRet Bearbts, for exmaple, are often heard but rarely seen. There are two main solutions. One is to seek out flowering trees, which will usually attract nectar-feeding birds. In particular, the rhodoleia trees beside the stream on the Red Walk flower from January to March and largely depend on birds for their pollination. The other solution is to be lucky or patient enough to encounter a 'bird wave' or mixed feeding flock. This can happen anywhere on the Red Walk or along the shortcut connecting the Red Walk to the stream. A single flock today contained at least 9 species: chestnut bulbuls, scarlet and grey-chinned minivets, yellow-browed warblers, yellow-crested tit, white-bellied erpornis, velvet-fronted nuthatch, Huet's fulvetta and a grey-headed canary flycatcher. A second flock included several Indochinese yuhina, rufous-capped babblers, common and mountain tailorbirds as well as more chestnut bulbuls. Pleasing to report that there were many more chestnut bulbuls in the forest than red-whiskered or Chinese bulbuls. Many of these species have recolonized Hong Kong following the regrowth of secondary forests, with Tai Po Kau being the most mature such site. To some extent the resulting avifauna may be representative of Hong Kong before its historical deforestation.  
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 09:49
Birders start as early as possible in the morning as there are fewer visitors and birds are more active (the exception being raptors which begin soaring around mid morning, after thermals have developed). A satisfying visit requires two to three hours. This will allow at least a circuit via the 'red' route which is well signposted and shown on maps at the site. There is a short cut leading across the stream which is useful if time is short. If one only has an hour an a half, a worthwhile visit can be achieved by going only as far as the warden's hut/toilet block. From here one can: (a) watch from the platform just past the warden's hut. Yellow-crested tit, Plain flowerpecker and Chestnut Bulbul may be seen frmo here. (b) turn left at the wrdne's hut nad explore the riverside walk ('flycatcher alley'). As well as various flycatchers acording to the season, Mountain and CHestnut bulbuls and Striated Heron may be seen here. (c) turn right at the hut along the paved rad and right again at the Education cAntre. THis leads to a nature trail and a pond which is popular for hatogaing sunbairds and leafbirds.

For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po Market (the closest MTR station) or (if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon) from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau.

Buses 72A and 73A and minibus 28K ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), just east of the entry point to the Reserve.

If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road midway between the Chinese University and Tai Po (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available at Tai Po Kau Park, 250m up the road to the east. But:

(i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays;

(ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are sometimes issued, especially to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road. 

One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, though the hilly ride would be strenuous and one might need to negotiate some busy roads in order to reach Tai Po Road.

Explain from where and how to get to this site with private and public transport.

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-10-03 11:12
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po Market (the closest MTR station) or (if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon) from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 72A and 73A and minibus 28K ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), just east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road midway between the Chinese University and Tai Po (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available at Tai Po Kau Park, 250m up the road to the east. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued sometimes issued, especially to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, though the hilly ride would be strenuous and one might need to negotiate some busy roads in order to reach Tai Po Road.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-22 02:27
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po Market (the closest MTR station) or, if or (if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, Kowloon) from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 72A and 73A and minibus 28K ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), just east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road midway between the Chinese University and Tai Po (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available at Tai Po Kau Park, 250m up the road to the east. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, though the hilly ride would be strenuous and one might need to negotiate some busy roads in order to reach Tai Po Road.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 12:18
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 72A and 73A and minibus 28K ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), just east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available at Tai Po Kau Park, 250m up the road to the east. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, though the hilly ride would be strenuous and one might need to negotiate some busy roads.roads in order to reach Tai Po Road.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-04 15:02
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 72A and 73A and minibus 28K ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), just east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across at Tai Po Kau Park, 250m up the road to the east, visible from the main car park.east. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, though the hilly ride would be strenuous and one might need to negotiate some busy roads.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 04:41
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 72A and 73A and minibus 28K ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), a short walk to just east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, though the hilly ride would be strenuous and one might need to negotiate some busy roads.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 03:17
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 28K, 72A and 73A and minibus 28K ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, though the hilly ride would be strenuous and one might need to negotiate some busy roads.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 02:02
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 28K, 72A and 73A ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, but though the hilly ride would be exhausting strenuous and one might need to negotiate some busy roads.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 00:19
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 28K, 72A and 73A ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po speed (speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, but the hilly ride would be exhausting and one might need to negotiate some busy roads.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 00:18
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Shatin, Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. Buses 28K, 72A and 73A ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen (松仔園), a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po.Po speed limits should be carefully observed here since there have been accidents on the winding road and speed cameras are installed). There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, but the hilly ride would be exhasuting exhausting and one might need to negotiate some busy roads.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:16
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. KMB buses 72, 73 Buses 28K, 72A and 74A 73A ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen, Yuen (松仔園), a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po. There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the reserve. Consequently, birders often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road.  One could cycle from Shatin or Tai Po, but the hilly ride would be exhasuting and one might need to negotiate some busy roads.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:11
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. KMB buses 72, 73 and 74A ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen, a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po. There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urben urban ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it resuts results in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the resreve. reserve. Consequently, birders opt to often park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:10
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. KMB buses 72, 73 and 74A ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen, a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily foudn found along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po. There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays holidays; (ii) the meters are standard urben ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it resuts in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the resreve. Consequently, birders opt to park in spaces which are not officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:23
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. KMB buses 72, 73 and 74A ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen, a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily foudn along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po. There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays (ii) the meters are standard urben ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it resuts in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the resreve. Consequently, birders opt to park in spaces which are not ofiially mdarted officially demarcated but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 09:36
For an early start, one may take a taxi from Tai Po (the closest MTR station) or, if coming from Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, from Fo Tan station. One should plan to return by bus since it may be difficult to get a taxi at Tai Po Kau. KMB buses 72, 73 and 74A ply between Shatin and Tai Po. Bus stops are at Chung Tsai Yuen, a short walk to east of the entry point to the Reserve. If driving, the site is quite easily foudn along Tai Po Road between the Chinese University and Tai Po. There is a large layby with parking slots on the southwest side of the road - not signposted, but fairly obvious since it is the only such site on this side of the road. A second car park is available just across the road to the east, visible from the main car park. But: (i) the metered spaces are often full, especially on fine days, weekends and holidays (ii) the meters are standard urben ones allowing only 2 hours which is barely enough for a serious birding visit; at best, it resuts in an unwelcome time constraint, especially since one must allow 15 minutes each way for walking up the road into the resreve. Consequently, birders opt to park in spaces which are not ofiially mdarted but appear safe, such as along the first part of the layby. This is generally tolerated but parking tickets are issued to vehicles obstructing passage of others or parked dangerously close to the main road. 

From the car park on Tai Po Road, access is via the paved road (Tai Po Kau Forest Track) beginning at a check point which is manned to prevent unauthorized vehicles from entering. A fairly steep walk of some 15 minutes ensues, during which some birds of interest should be seen (such as Yellow-crested Tit, Scarlet-backed Flowerpacker, Long-tailed Shrike, Red-flanked Bluetail and Olive-backed Pipit in winter). Do not be distracted by the Nature Trail on the left which is not productive for birding. The road leads to the warden's hut and toilet block, at which point one can scan the area for birds, consult the map and choose one or more of the trails to follow.

The map appears to show an alternative access route on the north side of the Tai Po Kau stream, but this road passes through private property. There is an alternative route to/from Tai Po Road through the village of Lai Chi Hang, but this constitutes a substantial detour which is not particularly rewarding in terms of bird life.

The reserve is normally open at all times. Nocturnal visits in search of owls may be made once one is familiar with the terrain.

Provide information on how to enter this site, which may include:
• entry points
• entry permits / entry tickets and fees
• opening hours / opening season
• other restrictions

Note that this section should only contain information on how to ACCESS (= enter) a site. Info on how to REACH a site should be added to "How to get there" section.

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 00:43
From the car park on Tai Po Road, access is via the paved road (Tai Po Kau Forest Track) beginning at a check point which is manned to prevent unauthorized vehicles from entering. A fairly steep walk of some 15 minutes ensues, during which some birds of interest should be seen (such as Yellow-crested Tit, Scarlet-backed Flowerpacker, Long-tailed Shrike, Red-flanked Bluetail and Olive-backed Pipit in winter). Do not be distracted by the Nature Trail on the left which is not productive for birding. The road leads to the warden's hut and toilet block, at which point one can scan the area for birds, consult the map and choose one or more of the trails to follow. The map appears to show an alternative access route on the north side of the Tai Po Kau stream, but this road passes through private property. There is an alternative route to/from Tai Po Road through the village of Lai Chi Hang, but this constitutes a substantial detour which is not particularly rewarding in terms of bird life.life. The reserve is normally open at all times. Nocturnal visits in search of owls may be made once one is familiar with the terrain.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-02 00:40
From the car park on Tai Po Road, access is via the paved road (Tai Po Kau Forest Track) beginning at a check point which is manned to prevent unauthorized vehicles from entering. A fairly steep walk of some 15 minutes ensues, during which some birds of interest should be seen (such as Yellow-crested Tit, Scarlet-backed Flowerpacker, Long-tailed Shrike, Red-flanked Bluetail and Olive-backed Pipit in winter). Do not be distracted by the Nature Trail on the left which is not productive for birding. The road leads to the warden's hut and toilet block, at which point one can scan the area for birds, consult the map and choose one or more of the trails to follow.follow. The map appears to show an alternative access route on the north side of the Tai Po Kau stream, but this road passes through private property. There is an alternative route to/from Tai Po Road through the village of Lai Chi Hang, but this constitutes a substantial detour which is not particularly rewarding in terms of bird life.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 13:25
From the car park on Tai Po Road, access is via the paved road (Tai Po Kau Forest Track) beginning at a check point which is manned to prevent unauthorized vehicles from entering. A fairly steep walk of some 15 minutes ensues, during which some birds of interest should be seen (such as Yellow-crested Tit, Scarlet-backed Flowerpacker, Long-tailed Shrike, Red-flanked Bluetail and Olive-backed Pipit in winter). Do not be distracted by the Nature Trail on the left which is not productive for birding. The road leads to the warden's hut and toilet block, at which point one can scan the area for birds, consult the map and choose one or more of the trails to follow.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:22
From the car park on Tai Po Road, access is via the paved road beginning at a check point which is manned to prevent unauthorized vehicles from entering. A fairly steep walk of some 15 minutes ensues, during which some birds of interest should be seen (such as Yellow-crested Tit, Scarlet-backed Flowerpacker, Long-tailed Shrike, Red-flanked Bluetail and Olive-backed Pipit in winter). Do not be distracted by the Nature Trail on the left which is not productive for birding. The road leads to the warden's hut and toilet block, at which point one can scan the area for birds, consult the map and choose one or more of the trails to follow.

The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories' which is highly recommended.  As one might guess from the presence of Crested Serpent Eagles, a range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably also the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as Forest Quaker, White-banded Flat and the spectacular Chinese Moon Moth.

The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors. Although this is more an option for serious hikers than for birders, it is possible to continue from Tai Po Kau up to Lead Mine Pass and down to Shing Mun Reservoir where transport is available.

Add information about other attractions at this site, including
• wildlife (apart from birds)
• sights (natural, cultural, archaeological, etc.)
• activities (e.g. for non-birding companions)

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-10-03 11:10
The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories' which is highly recommended.  As one might guess from the presence of Crested Serpent Eagles, a range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably also the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as Forest Quaker, White-banded Flat and the spectacular Chinese Moon Moth. The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors. Although this is more an option for serious hikers than for birders, it is possible to continue from Tai Po Kau up to Lead Mine Pass and down to Shing Mun Reservoir where transport is available.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-21 14:11
The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories' which is highly recommended.  As one might guess from the presence of Crested Serpent Eagles, a range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably also the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as White-banded Flat and the spectacular Chinese Moon Moth. The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors. Although this is more an option for serious hikers than for birders, it is possible to continue from Tai Po Kau up to Lead Mine Pass and down to Shing Mun Reservoir where transport is available.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 12:07
The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories' which is highly recommended.  As one might guess from the presence of Crested Serpent Eagles, a range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as White-banded Flat and the spectacular Chinese moon moth. Moon Moth. The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors. Although this is more an option for serious hikers than for birders, it is possible to continue from Tai Po Kau up to Lead Mine Pass and down to Shing Mun Reservoir where transport is available.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 07:45
The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories'. Territories' which is highly recommended.  As one might guess from the presence of Crested Serpent Eagles, a range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as the spectacular Chinese moon moth. The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors. Although this is more an option for serious hikers than for birders, it is possible to continue from Tai Po Kau up to Lead Mine Pass and down to Shing Mun Reservoir where transport is available.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-04 15:28
The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories'. A As one might guess from the presence of Crested Serpent Eagles, a range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as the spectacular Chinese moon moth. The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors. Although this is more an option for serious hikers than for birders, it is possible to continue from Tai Po Kau up to Lead Mine Pass and down to Shing Mun Reservoir where transport is available.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-04 14:52
The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories'. A range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as the spectacular Chinese moon moth. The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors. Although this is more an option for serious hikers than for birders, it is possible to continue from Tai Po Kau up to Lead Mine Pass and down to Shing Mun Reservoir where transport is available.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-04 14:51
The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories'. A range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as the spectacular Chinese moon moth. The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors. Although this is more an option for serious hikers than birders, it is possible to continue from Tai Po Kau up to Lead Mine Pass and down to Shing Mun Reservoir where transport is available.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 10:54
The rich and extensive forest supports a wide range of wildlife, as described in David Diskin's guidebook 'Hong Kong Nature Walks: the New Territories'. A range of snakes, lizards and amphibians may be encountered. Rhesus macaque and Pallas' squirrel are common, though the squirrels and probably the macaques are introduced. A wide range of butterflies and moths are present, some of them uncommon in Hong Kong, such as the spectacular Chinese moon moth. The walks are scenic and popular with non-birding visitors.

Informative signboards including maps are provided around the site.

There are several designated Picnic Sites with benches and tables (shown as green tables on the map).

Restrooms are available beside the warden's hut at the beginning of the trails.

The nearest restaurant is the Billow Bar Seafood Bistro (formerly Little Egret), located downstream where the Tai Po Kau stream flows into Tolo Harbour. This is an interesting spot with a small estuary supporting some bird life, though rather spoilt by conversion of the lake into a water sports venue. One can drive there in 5 minutes or walk there in 15-20 minutes from the car park via paths shown on the map.

Provide information about what type of facilities are available at
or near this site, including:
• information centers / information points
• catering
• accommodation
• hides and watchtowers
• restrooms / toilets

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-21 02:12
Informative signboards including maps are provided around the site. There are several designated Picnic Sites with benches and tables (shown as green tables on the map). Restrooms are available beside the warden's hut at the beginning of the trails. The nearest restaurant is the Billow Bar Seafood Bistro (formerly Little Egret, Egret), located downstream where the Tai Po Kau stream flows into Tolo Harbour. This is an interesting spot with a small estuary supporting some bird life, though rather spoilt by conversion of the lake into a water sports venue. One can drive there in 5 minutes or walk there in 15-20 minutes from the car park via paths shown on the map. The restaurant offers both Chinese and Western dishes.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 09:44
Informative signboards including maps are provided around the site. There are several designated Picnic Sites with benches and tables (shown as green tables on the map). Restrooms are available beside the warden's hut at the beginning of the trails. The nearest restaurant is Little Egret, located downstream where the Tai Po Kau stream flows into Tolo Harbour. This is an interesting spot with some bird life, though somewhat rather spoilt by conversion of the lake into a water sports venue. One can drive there in 5 minutes or walk there in 15-20 minutes from the car park via paths shown on the map. The restaurant offers both Chinese and Western dishes.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 07:41
Informative signboards including maps are provided around the site. There are several designated Picnic Sites with benches and tables (shown as green tables on the map). Restrooms are available beside the warden's hut at the beginning of the trails.trails. The nearest restaurant is Little Egret, located downstream where the Tai Po Kau stream flows into Tolo Harbour. This is an interesting spot with some bird life, though somewhat spoilt by conversion of the lake into a water sports venue. One can drive there in 5 minutes or walk there in 15-20 minutes from the car park via paths shown on the map. The restaurant offers both Chinese and Western dishes.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 13:05
Informative signboards including maps are provided around the site. There are several designated Picnic Sites with benches and tables (shown as green tables on the map). Restrooms are available beside the warden's hut at the beginning of the trails.
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 11:51
Informative signboards including maps are provided around the site. Restrooms are available beside the warden's hut at the beginning of the trails.

Mosquitoes are annoying during the wet season (mid April to mid October) when citronella spray/patches or other deterrents are recommended.

Venomous snakes are present but daytime encounters and bites are rare, and the danger is low if one stays on the paths. Most bites in Hong Kong are from the Bamboo Pit Viper (bright green with a triangular head) and occur at night. Study shoes or hiking boots provide additional protection, and are in any case recommended for the sometimes rough terrain.

Throughout the year but especially in the dry season when hiking is popular, the trails can be crowded with sometimes noisy walkers and joggers. To minimise the disturbance a weekday morning is ideal. 

Are there any security issues or other annoyances at this site? For
instance, these may include:
• offenses like robbery or theft
• natural hazards
• dangerous or annoying animals or plants (mosquitoes, leaches, thorn bushes, etc.)
• noise pollution

Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-21 14:12
Mosquitoes are annoying during the wet season (mid April to mid October) when citronella spray/patches or other deterrents are recommended. Venomous snakes are present but daytime encounters and bites are rare, and the danger is low if one stays on the paths. Most bites in Hong Kong are from the Bamboo Pit Viper (bright green with a triangular head).head) and occur at night. Study shoes or hiking boots provide additional protection, and are in any case recommended for the sometimes rough terrain. Throughout the year but especially in the dry season when hiking is popular, the trails can be crowded with sometimes noisy walkers and joggers. To minimise the disturbance a weekday morning is ideal. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-09 08:03
Mosquitoes are annoying during the wet season (mid April to mid October) when citronella spray/patches or other deterrents are recommended. Venomous snakes are present but daytime encounters and bites are rare, and the danger is low if one stays on the paths. Most bites in Hong Kong are from the Bamboo Pit Viper (bright green with a triangular head). Study shoes or hiking boots provide additional protection, and are in any case recommended for the sometimes rough terrain. Throughout the year but especially in the dry season when hiking is popular, the trails can be crowded with sometimes noisy walkers and joggers. To minimise the disturbance a weekday morning is ideal. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-04 15:27
Mosquitoes are annoying during the wet season (mid April to mid October) when citronella spray/patches or other deterrents are recommended. Venomous snakes are present but daytime encounters and bites are rare, and the danger is low if one stays on the paths. Most bites in Hong Kong are from the Bamboo Pit Viper (bright green with a triangular head). head). Study shoes or hiking boots provide additional protection, and are in any case recommended for the terrain. Throughout the year but especially in the dry season when hiking is popular, the trails can be crowded with sometimes noisy walkers and joggers. To minimise the disturbance a weekday morning is ideal. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 16:16
Mosquitoes are annoying during the wet season (mid April to mid October) when citronella spray/patches or other deterrents are recommended. Venomous snakes are present but daytime encounters and bites are rare, and the danger is low if one stays on the paths. Most bites in Hong Kong are from the Bamboo Pit Viper (bright green with a triangular head). Throughout the year but especially in the dry season when hiking is popular, the trails are can be crowded with sometimes noisy walkers and joggers. To minimise the disturbance a weekday morning is ideal. 
Edited by Stephen Matthews on 2021-09-01 12:00
Mosquitoes are annoying during the wet season (mid April to mid October) when citronella spray/patches or other deterrents are recommended. Venomous snakes are present but daytime encounters and bites are rare, and the danger is low if one stays on the paths. Most bites in Hong Kong are from the Bamboo Pit Viper (bright green with a triangular head). Throughout the year but especially in the dry season when hiking is popular, the trails are crowded with sometimes noisy walkers and joggers. To minimise the disturbance a weekday morning is ideal. 
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Orniverse: Tai Po Kau NR - Hong Kong