Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge

22.22773 , -159.40139

United States Of America

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The introductory text should contain general information about the site, which may include for instance:
• geographic/ biogeographic location
• habitat and vegetation
• typical bird species/bird communities
• protection status
• land use and history
• importance for birdwatching

Coordinates were set by Adrian Burke : 22.2277/-159.4014 (2022-09-13 03:57:50 )

Site name was set by Adrian Burke as "Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge" (2022-09-13 03:57:50 )

Not available yet

List up to ca. 25 species that:
• have a limited distribution range and/or are rare on a global level
• are most sought-after by birdwatchers at this site
• and are relatively easy to see at this site (year-round or seasonally)

Hawaiian Goose (Branta sandvicensis)
White-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon lepturus)
Red-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon rubricauda)
Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis)
Kermadec Petrel (Pterodroma neglecta)
Wedge-tailed Shearwater (Ardenna pacifica)
Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor)
Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster)
Red-footed Booby (Sula sula)

Red-footed Booby (Sula sula) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:04:25)

Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:04:13)

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:04:03)

Wedge-tailed Shearwater (Ardenna pacifica) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:03:51)

Kermadec Petrel (Pterodroma neglecta) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:03:34)

Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:03:24)

Red-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon rubricauda) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:03:01)

White-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon lepturus) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:02:46)

Hawaiian Goose (Branta sandvicensis) was added by Adrian Burke (2022-09-13 04:01:03)

Must make a ticketed entry reservation ( https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/300018 ) in advance to enter the refuge, but otherwise can view from the overlook at the end of and still see most species. Time of day doesn't seem to matter a whole lot, as the breeding seabirds tend to be around and come and go all day or at any time of day. Ticketed reservations technically last 45 minutes but you can really stay as long as you want once you're in (until closing at 4:00 pm). In one hour you will probably be able to see most breeding species, but more time and some luck may be required for things like Kermadec Petrel and for seabirds that you might see only be seawatching with a scope. Short walk from parking lot to the tip of the point where the lighthouse is, and you can pre-arrange to be driven out there in a golf cart by refuge staff if you have limited mobility.

Laysan Albatross are easy to see here during the breeding season, mainly November-June. At the end of the breeding season (June, July, maybe early August) bring a scope and/or ask the park staff to show you where the chicks are (distant views), as adults won't be flying around. Red-tailed Tropicbirds are here year-round, but mostly in the peak of their breeding season February-October. Small numbers of Kermadec Petrels have been seen here year after year in recent years and are likely breeding in small numbers at the refuge. This species can take time and multiple visits to see, so be patient and vigilant. Most records of Kermadec Petrel are between April and September. Boobies and Frigatebirds are numerous and easily visible year-round.

Give recommendations for making your visit as productive as possible.
This may include for instance:
• best season
• best time of the day
• how much time to spend at the site
• best means of locomotion within the site
• recommended routes / areas within the site
• guiding

Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:37
Must make a ticketed entry reservation ( https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/300018 ) in advance to enter the refuge, but otherwise can view from the overlook at the end of and still see most species. Time of day doesn't seem to matter a whole lot, as the breeding seabirds tend to be around and come and go all day or at any time of day. Ticketed reservations technically last 45 minutes but you can really stay as long as you want once you're in (until closing at 4:00 pm). In one hour you will probably be able to see most breeding species, but more time and some luck may be required for things like Kermadec Petrel and for seabirds that you might see only be seawatching with a scope. Short walk from parking lot to the tip of the point where the lighthouse is, and you can pre-arrange to be driven out there in a golf cart by refuge staff if you have limited mobility. Laysan Albatross are easy to see here during the breeding season, mainly November-June. At the end of the breeding season (June, July, maybe early August) bring a scope and/or ask the park staff to show you where the chicks are (distant views), as adults won't be flying around. Red-tailed Tropicbirds are here year-round, but mostly in the peak of their breeding season February-October. Small numbers of Kermadec Petrels have been seen here year after year in recent years and are likely breeding in small numbers at the refuge. This species can take time and multiple visits to see, so be patient and vigilant. Most records of Kermadec Petrel are between April and September. Boobies and Frigatebirds are numerous and easily visible year-round.
Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:37
Must make a ticketed entry reservation ( https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/300018 ) in advance to enter the refuge, but otherwise can view from the overlook at the end of and still see most species. Time of day doesn't seem to matter a whole lot, as the breeding seabirds tend to be around and come and go all day or at any time of day. Ticketed reservations technically last 45 minutes but you can really stay as long as you want once you're in (until closing at 4:00 pm). In one hour you will probably be able to see most breeding species, but more time and some luck may be required for things like Kermadec Petrel and for seabirds that you might see only be seawatching with a scope. Short walk from parking lot to the tip of the point where the lighthouse is, and you can pre-arrange to be driven out there in a golf cart by refuge staff if you have limited mobility.mobility. Laysan Albatross are easy to see here during the breeding season, mainly November-June. At the end of the breeding season (June, July, maybe early August) bring a scope and/or ask the park staff to show you where the chicks are (distant views), as adults won't be flying around. Red-tailed Tropicbirds are here year-round, but mostly in the peak of their breeding season February-October. Small numbers of Kermadec Petrels have been seen here year after year in recent years and are likely breeding in small numbers at the refuge. This species can take time and multiple visits to see, so be patient and vigilant. Most records of Kermadec Petrel are between April and September.
Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:19
Must make a ticketed entry reservation ( https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/300018 ) in advance to enter the refuge, but otherwise can view from the overlook at the end of and still see most species. Time of day doesn't seem to matter a whole lot, as the breeding seabirds tend to be around and come and go all day or at any time of day. Ticketed reservations technically last 45 minutes but you can really stay as long as you want once you're in (until closing at 4:00 pm). In one hour you will probably be able to see most breeding species, but more time and some luck may be required for things like Kermadec Petrel and for seabirds that you might see only be seawatching with a scope. Short walk from parking lot to the tip of the point where the lighthouse is, and you can pre-arrange to be driven out there in a golf cart by refuge staff if you have limited mobility.

Driving: From Kuhio Highway, turn onto Kolo Rd, then turn left onto Kilauea Rd and drive until the end. Drive through the gate and down the hill if you have a ticket to enter. Otherwise park at the small parking lot near the gate to look in from the overlook there. Closest bus stop is the Kilauea Gym stop on the 400/500 route of the Kaua'i Bus (5-10 minute bike ride or 20-30 minute walk to the refuge).

Explain from where and how to get to this site with private and public transport.

Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:33
Driving: From Kuhio Highway, turn onto Kolo Rd, then turn left onto Kilauea Rd and drive until the end. Drive through the gate and down the hill if you have a ticket to enter. Otherwise park at the small parking lot near the gate to look in from the overlook there. Closest bus stop is the Kilauea Gym stop on the 400/500 route of the Kaua'i Bus (5-10 minute bike ride or 20-30 minute walk to the refuge).
Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:21
Driving: From Kuhio Highway, turn onto Kolo Rd, then turn left onto Kilauea Rd and drive until the end. Drive through the gate and down the hill if you have a ticket to enter. Otherwise park at the small parking lot near the gate to look in from the overlook there.

Main entry point is at the end of Kilauea Rd, where you can enter the refuge only if you've made a reservation ( https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/300018 ). Best to book a few weeks in advance. Earliest ticketed entry time is 10:00 am and refuge closes at 4:00 pm. You can view from an overlook at the end of Kilauea Rd without a ticket. Note that most area in the refuge is not open to the public. There is another way to look into the refuge but it is much more difficult to get to and is a bit sketchy unless you are fit and comfortable walking on uneven terrain: Navigate to Rock Quarry beach at the east end of the National Wildlife Refuge and park at the end of Kahili Beach Rd. From here, cross through the water at the end of Kilauea Stream at the west end of the beach (water typically about ankle-knee deep for a width of about 2-3 meters). Walk north/northeast along the path and along the predator fence until you get to a more exposed area with tidepools and rocky cliffs on your left side. Kermadec Petrels have been repeatedly seen here in 2022. You can walk a very uneven non-trail out to the north end of this peninsula and then walk a tiny bit west to get an amazing view of the entire NWR, with distant views of a very large Red-footed Booby Colony. Tropicbirds nest in the cliffs here, and Black Noddies and Wedge-tailed Shearwaters can be seen over the ocean.

Provide information on how to enter this site, which may include:
• entry points
• entry permits / entry tickets and fees
• opening hours / opening season
• other restrictions

Note that this section should only contain information on how to ACCESS (= enter) a site. Info on how to REACH a site should be added to "How to get there" section.

Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:34
Main entry point is at the end of Kilauea Rd, where you can enter the refuge only if you've made a reservation ( https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/300018 ). Best to book a few weeks in advance. Earliest ticketed entry time is 10:00 am and refuge closes at 4:00 pm. You can view from an overlook at the end of Kilauea Rd without a ticket. Note that most area in the refuge is not open to the public. There is another way to look into the refuge but it is much more difficult to get to and is a bit sketchy unless you are fit and comfortable walking on uneven terrain: Navigate to Rock Quarry beach at the east end of the National Wildlife Refuge and park at the end of Kahili Beach Rd. From here, cross through the water at the end of Kilauea Stream at the west end of the beach (water typically about ankle-knee deep for a width of about 2-3 meters). Walk north/northeast along the path and along the predator fence until you get to a more exposed area with tidepools and rocky cliffs on your left side. Kermadec Petrels have been repeatedly seen here in 2022. You can walk a very uneven non-trail out to the north end of this peninsula and then walk a tiny bit west to get an amazing view of the entire NWR, with distant views of a very large Red-footed Booby Colony. Tropicbirds nest in the cliffs here, and Black Noddies and Wedge-tailed Shearwaters can be seen over the ocean.
Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:28
Main entry point is at the end of Kilauea Rd, where you can enter the refuge only if you've made a reservation ( https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/300018 ). Best to book a few weeks in advance. Earliest ticketed entry time is 10:00 am and refuge closes at 4:00 pm. You can view from an overlook at the end of Kilauea Rd without a ticket. There is another way to look into the refuge but it is much more difficult to get to and is a bit sketchy unless you are fit and comfortable walking on uneven terrain: Navigate to Rock Quarry beach at the east end of the National Wildlife Refuge and park at the end of Kahili Beach Rd. From here, cross through the water at the end of Kilauea Stream at the west end of the beach (water typically about ankle-knee deep for a width of about 2-3 meters). Walk north/northeast along the path and along the predator fence until you get to a more exposed area with tidepools and rocky cliffs on your left side. Kermadec Petrels have been repeatedly seen here in 2022. You can walk a very uneven non-trail out to the north end of this peninsula and then walk a tiny bit west to get an amazing view of the entire NWR, with distant views of a very large Red-footed Booby Colony. Tropicbirds nest in the cliffs here, and Black Noddies and Wedge-tailed Shearwaters can be seen over the ocean.

Historic lighthouse, Green Sea Turtles, Spinner Dolphins, Humpback Whales, Hawaiian Monk Seals

Add information about other attractions at this site, including
• wildlife (apart from birds)
• sights (natural, cultural, archaeological, etc.)
• activities (e.g. for non-birding companions)

Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 03:59
Historic lighthouse, Green Sea Turtles, Spinner Dolphins, Humpback Whales, Hawaiian Monk Seals

Gift shop, information centers, bathrooms. Golf cart access provided by USFWS staff for the disabled.

Provide information about what type of facilities are available at
or near this site, including:
• information centers / information points
• catering
• accommodation
• hides and watchtowers
• restrooms / toilets

Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:00
Gift shop, information centers, bathrooms. Golf cart access provided by USFWS staff for the disabled.

For the unofficial route to view from the east end of the preserve near Rock Quarry Beach, hazards include very uneven and jagged terrain, waves and high tide, and rocks falling from the above cliffs. Exercise caution if attempting to view from this side. No such concerns from the main/official access point on the west side by the lighthouse.

Are there any security issues or other annoyances at this site? For
instance, these may include:
• offenses like robbery or theft
• natural hazards
• dangerous or annoying animals or plants (mosquitoes, leaches, thorn bushes, etc.)
• noise pollution

Edited by Adrian Burke on 2022-09-13 04:30
For the unofficial route to view from the east end of the preserve near Rock Quarry Beach, hazards include very uneven and jagged terrain, waves and high tide, and rocks falling from the above cliffs. Exercise caution if attempting to view from this side. No such concerns from the main/official access point on the west side by the lighthouse.
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Orniverse: Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge - United States of America